Mystery & Crime Book Reviews

TRAIL OF ECHOES by Rachel Howzell Hall
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 31, 2016

"The third and best of a finely wrought series (Skies of Ash, 2015, etc.) that gives voice to a rare figure in crime fiction: a highly complex, fully imagined black female detective."
Talented African-American teenagers from a poor LA neighborhood are targeted by a serial killer. Read full book review >
MISSING, PRESUMED by Susie Steiner
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 28, 2016

"Hopefully, this is just the first adventure of many Steiner (Homecoming, 2013) will write for DS Bradshaw and her team."
A new and complex police heroine tries to solve a high-profile missing persons case while seeking domestic fulfillment in Cambridge. Read full book review >

BUFFALO JUMP BLUES by Keith McCafferty
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 28, 2016

"The fifth case for McCafferty's fly-tying detective is as rich in history, local color, and unique characters as the first four. You can't help hoping that the two leads will solve the problems of their relationship as readily as all those crimes."
An animal sacrifice is prelude to human murder in Montana. Read full book review >
NO GOOD TO CRY by Andrew Lanh
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 5, 2016

"Lanh (Return to Dust, 2015, etc.) poses an excellent mystery with a surprising twist while exploring the psychological scars inflicted by a war long ago."
Can solving a tough case expiate a detective's private sins? Read full book review >
THE BAKER STREET JURORS by Michael Robertson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 19, 2016

"Robertson, who seems to command an unlimited stream of clever ideas for recycling the Holmes legend without resuscitating the great man, outdoes himself in the most effervescent of his five Baker Street cocktails to date."
It was only a matter of time, and now it's happened at last: Sherlock Holmes gets called to jury duty. Read full book review >

Kirkus Interview
Fernanda Santos
author of THE FIRE LINE
May 17, 2016

When a bolt of lightning ignited a hilltop in the sleepy town of Yarnell, Arizona, in June 2013, setting off a blaze that would grow into one of the deadliest fires in American history, the 20 men who made up the Granite Mountain Hotshots sprang into action. New York Times writer Fernanda Santos’ debut book The Fire Line is the story of the fire and the Hotshots’ attempts to extinguish it. An elite crew trained to combat the most challenging wildfires, the Hotshots were a ragtag family, crisscrossing the American West and wherever else the fires took them. There's Eric Marsh, their devoted and demanding superintendent who turned his own personal demons into lessons he used to mold, train and guide his crew; Jesse Steed, their captain, a former Marine, a beast on the fire line and a family man who wasn’t afraid to say “I love you” to the firemen he led; Andrew Ashcraft, a team leader still in his 20s who struggled to balance his love for his beautiful wife and four children and his passion for fighting wildfires. We see this band of brothers at work, at play and at home, until a fire that burned in their own backyards leads to a national tragedy. View video >