Mystery Thriller Book Reviews (page 1588)

'SALEM'S LOT by Stephen King
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Oct. 17, 1975

"Vampirism, necrophilia, et dreadful alia rather overplayed by the author of Carrie (1974)."
A super-exorcism that leaves the taste of somebody else's blood in your mouth and what a bad taste it is. Read full book review >

THE DEEP BLUE GOOD-BY by John D. MacDonald
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Sept. 8, 1975

"After all there's still that lovely sheen of sun and sex which is what counts most."
McGee, graying around the edges of his sideburns (at least he talks that way), assumes his simplest job to date. Read full book review >
THE GREAT TRAIN ROBBERY by Michael Crichton
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1975

"Surely it will be the highest-handed entertainment of the season and all the money rides, once again."
Mr. Crichton at his versatile, confident best—with all the clout of a cosh or an eel-skin or a sack or a neddy (you'll learn all this voker romeny or criminal jargon here)—has written a documentary of that heist and provided along with it a grand tour de force of the criminal underworld. Read full book review >
THE CONTINENTAL OP by Dashiell Hammett
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Nov. 1, 1974

"Irish, Cain, Chandler and of course Macdonald."
Simply, these are seven stories about Hammett's no-name, middle-aging detective who first appeared in the Black Mask — "long unavailable" (query — never in book form before?). Read full book review >

GOD SAVE THE CHILD by Robert B. Parker
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Oct. 21, 1974

"Cheeky, bright entertainment with a very ulterior transgressor."
Spenser of The Godwulf Manuscript is not trying to be like anybody else this time and he's a disarmingly casual private investigator who says anything which comes into his head and it's usually pretty funny. Read full book review >
A DEADLY SHADE OF GOLD by John D. MacDonald
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Oct. 7, 1974

"Not the best — but full value in the series with that man at the height of his puissance."
L'homme ultimate sensuel, McGee (this is a 1965 reissue) decides to exact reparations for the death of his friend Sam, brutally killed at the moment of his reconciliation with his girl, Nora — leaving behind him the evidence of one of those priceless pre-Columbian gold statuettes. Read full book review >
TINKER, TAILOR, SOLDIER, SPY by John le Carré
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: June 1, 1974

"We have no other thinking man's world of intelligence."
But "What's the access?" Read full book review >
CARRIE by Stephen King
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: April 8, 1974

"But as they still say around here, 'Sit a spell and collect yourself.'"
Figuratively and literally shattering moments of hoRRRRRipilication in Chamberlain, Maine where stones fly from the sky rather than from the hands of the villagers (as they did in "The Lottery," although the latter are equal to other forms of persecution). Read full book review >
QUICK RED FOX by John D. MacDonald
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: March 11, 1974

"The story's not all that much (it's one of the early ones) but for many people McGee's sunburned macho is very operative however much you suspect it's only mantan."
. . . who has to jump is a motion picture star who has bought, and bought, and bought up some skin candids which could destroy her altogether. Read full book review >
THE DREADFUL LEMON SKY by John D. MacDonald
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Feb. 26, 1974

"Assume and you won't be wrong that McGee no longer needs a vehicle — he just emanates like Brut."
A new one (i.e., the second to appear originally in hardcover) and even if the story leaves something to be desired, McGee of course does not as two young women put themselves in his soothing to stimulating hands — the first leaving a box with $94,000 in bills before her apartment is trashed and she is killed. Read full book review >
TURQUOISE LAMENT by John D. MacDonald
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Oct. 30, 1973

"But there's a smashing scene at the end to make up for all that lost time when in McGee's own inimitable words life has been ''running out the bottom of the tube."
The most notable thing here is that this is the first time MacDonald has appeared initially in hardcover, although as he idles along, you might wonder what happened to what's happening since MacDonald has been so well established as one of the real hellbent storytellers in the business. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >