Mystery Thriller Book Reviews (page 1589)

THE FIRE SHIP by Peter Tonkin
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: May 1, 1992

"As it should."
Middle Eastern terrorists make it necessary for shipping magnates Richard and Robin Mariner, who last sailed in The Coffin Ship (1991), to break off their vacation and go to war. Read full book review >
THE CIRCLE by David Poyer
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: May 1, 1992

"Poyer's depictions of the contemporary American Navy continue to be unequalled for authenticity."
The first cruise of a newly commissioned Annapolis graduate takes him to the brink of war in the Arctic—in another realistic naval adventure by the author of The Med (1988) and The Gulf (1990). Read full book review >

SCORPION STRIKE by John J. Nance
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: May 1, 1992

"White-knuckle flight scenes more than make up for some silly business about the woman both pilots loved."
Unspeakably nasty Iraqi microbes threaten to overturn the victory of Desert Storm. Read full book review >
RELATIVE SINS by Cynthia Victor
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 1992

"Well-paced and readable for devotees of the genre."
Victor's hardcover debut—a contemporary romance that probes the powerful bonds between mother and daughter, despite a fate that seems to have forced them forever apart. Read full book review >
LITTLE GREY MICE by Brian Freemantle
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: May 1, 1992

"Richly textured characters, the unusual premise, and Reimann's hypnotically cruel seduction—all make this, despite flaws (including an occasional snail's pace), one of Freemantle's finest."
A compelling case of sexpionage set in Bonn at the thaw of the cold war, by veteran spymeister Freemantle (O'Farrell's Law, 1989, etc.). ``Little grey mice,'' Freemantle lets us know, is spy slang ``for lonely, unattached women employed in government service''- -women like Elke Meyer, personal assistant to a top West German cabinet minister and perfect prey for a man like Otto Reimann, an East German ``raven''—a male spy trained in the arts of sexual seduction. Read full book review >

A QUESTION OF TIME by Fred Saberhagen
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: May 1, 1992

"Starts well, ends comic-strippy."
Dark fantasy about a deformity in time in the Grand Canyon, by the author of the Berserker and Lost Swords series, etc. Saberhagen begins his time-warp tale by anchoring it solidly in gritty 1935, with down-and-outer Jake Rezner coming across a young woman artist in the Grand Canyon with whom he falls into an affair. Read full book review >
SPIRITWALK by Charles de Lint
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: May 1, 1992

"A disappointment from the author of Jack the Giant Killer and Drink the Moon."
A ``fix-up'' to de Lint's Moonheart (1984), consisting of one short and three long stories previously published separately and a brief prologue. Read full book review >
BLOODY TEN by William Love
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: April 30, 1992

"Though they still haven't escaped Nero Wolfe's portly shadow, Love's homages have now gotten to be quite a treat in their own right."
The third case for brainy, wheelchair-bound Bishop Francis X. Regan and his Archie Goodwinish factotum/narrator Davey Goldman (The Chartreuse Clue, The Fundamentals of Murder). Read full book review >
ALMOST HISTORY by Christopher Bram
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 27, 1992

"Some of this is programmatic, but Bram convincingly re-creates a historical moment from a gay perspective."
Bram's fourth novel (In Memory of Angel Clare, 1989, etc.) dramatizes 35 years in the life of a career diplomat who comes out of the closet; the backdrop consists of political intrigue in the Philippines during the Marcos era. Read full book review >
SLEEPING DOGS by Thomas Perry
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: April 24, 1992

"Tough and energetic, but suffering from a moral black hole at the center: the Butcher Boy himself, a finally unsympathetic antihero whose nonstop killing makes him little more than a thinking person's Terminator."
Since his Edgar-winning debut with Butcher's Boy (1982), Perry has inked a series of bold seriocomic thrillers (Metzger's Dog, Big Fish, Island) with ever more guffaws than grit. Read full book review >
BLOOD RELATIVE by Carolyn Hougan
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: April 20, 1992

Despite a highfalutin Author's Note describing it as ``a book about `real' and received memory, about our inability to escape the past, about deception and discovery,'' this is really a two-act melodrama about a crazed victim of Argentine political terrorism who, after losing his entire family except for his three-year-old niece—years ago spirited off to America—decides (don't ask why) to avenge himself by finding and killing the niece. Read full book review >
LAST CALL by Tim Powers
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: April 20, 1992

"Knockout poker sequences give the symbolism real sizzle, while the genre is enlivened throughout with great lines from Eliot."
Rich, top-flight mythic fantasy based on Jungian archetypes, Tarot symbolism, T.S. Eliot's The Waste Land, and the Parsifal legend; by the smartly acclaimed author of On Stranger Tides, 1987, etc. Luck could not flow with more Jungian synchronicity for Powers than his having cast Bugsy Siegel as The Fisher King in this long novel just as Warren Beatty's Bugsy has fixed the nation's eye on the Oscar race, along with Robin Williams's turn as The Fisher King. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >