A PERSON FROM BRITAIN by N. M. Bodecker

A PERSON FROM BRITAIN

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KIRKUS REVIEW

There was an old person from Britain/ whose head was the shape of a mitten./ 'You're handsome!' they said,/ shaking hands with his head,/ 'You woolly old person from Britain.' "" In itself a fair enough imitation of Lear, this is all the funnier when accompanied by Bodecker's drawing of the bristly, mitten-like head with its mitten-thumb nose. And though putting noses on roses might seem an unpromising ploy, few will resist the sight of Bodecker's ""kindly old gardener"" blowing his rosebush's sniffles. The girl whose nose ""started twisting and twirling"" when she took creams to curl her hair is another happy match of words and pictures--as are the girl with a fig tree for hair, the Kirgize wearing his yurt (now there's a look-it-up word or two), the sad basset hound of Cohasset, and more. Bodecker pokes no fun at the limerick form itself, preferring to play by the old rules and demonstrate his proficiency at the game. Which he does, with a good supply of ludicrous images, awful place-name puns, and delightfully fluent foolishness.

Pub Date: March 13th, 1980
Publisher: Atheneum