FINANCIAL SAVVY FOR SINGLES by Nancy Dunnan

FINANCIAL SAVVY FOR SINGLES

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Financial savvy, as the author of this hit-and-miss primer concedes, transcends marital status. So, in search of a niche, Dunnan purports to focus on the ""emotional aspects"" of money management for singles--the widowed and divorced, as well as the never-married. Along those lines, there's as much gush (""everyone admires the single who can dine alone"") as standard guidance (avoid major decisions when in transit). Otherwise, Dunnan starts conventionally, counseling an immediate inventory of personal assets and realistic budgeting. Then, less conventionally, she randomly surveys child-care tax credits, solo travel (with an unaccountable lot on bed-and-board lodgings), vacation homes (including an upbeat assessment of time-shared condos), and (iffily) the situation of gay couples and POSSLQs. There's also a sketchy rundown on investment opportunities (which suggests, for one thing, that Dunnan isn't clear on the difference between a mutual fund and an investment trust). Also scanted are retirement and estate planning, insurance (health-care coverage, in particular), credit, and conventional savings outlets. In sum: not in a league with Bob Rosefsky's Money Talks (1982) for never-marrieds, once-marrieds, or anybody.

Pub Date: July 25th, 1983
Publisher: Rawson/Scribners