THE ART OF HANDBELL RINGING by Nancy Poore Tufts

THE ART OF HANDBELL RINGING

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KIRKUS REVIEW

In addition to the value of this small text as a handbook for leaders of handbell bands and choirs, there is given to the uninitiated a brief history of the ""ancient and honorable art of English handbell ringing"" and its still earlier origins in the hands of primitive man. Probably the first crude bells possessed the deep religious significance they now hold in all religions, for the bell has ever rung out the glad tidings even as it tolled the knell of death. Whether these bells be rung as a hobby for young people, as an expression of cultural perfection by professionals or as therapy of the best sort for the blind and the mentally disturbed, the ringing of the bells proves a delight and joy to all. It is interesting to note that in England handbells were devised in the Sixteenth Century for practise use in pealing or change ringing, it being more comfortable to sit around a table in a warm room practising with bells having wooden or leather handgrips rather than to stand for hours in a cold tower pulling the ropes. The larger part of the book is devoted to technical matters: selection of applicants for choirs, detailed assignments for large group ringing, diagrams, handbell musicits scoring, etc. A very timely volume for a growing art form.

Pub Date: March 13th, 1961
Publisher: Abingdon Press