THE MAN WITH THE TAKE-APART HEAD by Nancy Winslow Parker

THE MAN WITH THE TAKE-APART HEAD

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Mr. Goozpah, pictured here in black outline drawings as an ordinary man whose head happens to open up and hinge back like a round lidded box, lives a simple life: working in the factory, cooking his own supper, then at bedtime, arranging on the top of the dresser the contents of his head -- eyes, brain, ears, nose and teeth. But one morning Mr. Goozpah forgets his nose, borrows ferret's for the day, and thus saves the factory by sniffing out the greasy barrel that has filled the place with smoke. Next morning, having borrowed rabbit's ears, he finds the rattle that has stopped the factory's machine, and on the third day with eagle's eyes he finds the manager's lost daughter. When Mr. Goozpah discovers after this that he has lost his heart, none of his animal friends will lend him theirs, but marriage to the manager's daughter soon fills the void and helps Mr. Goozpah get himself together. Out of the way, but Parker has a good head for offbeat drollery.

Pub Date: Aug. 12th, 1974
Publisher: Dodd, Mead