BETWEEN THE DARK AND THE DAYLIGHT by Nanoy Hale

BETWEEN THE DARK AND THE DAYLIGHT

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

Short stories -- and good ones, though not particularly significant from the angle of the expert who is following ""trends"" in this metier, Nancy Hale spins a plausible tale and writes good dialogue. The majority of the stories deal with modern people in modern situations, and many of them have a nostalgic, autobiographical flavor, as she writes (sometimes in third person, sometimes in first), of dancing school days, of problems of feeling on the outside looking in, of illness, etc. The war has touched but lightly -- there is one refugee story; and one on race prejudice; one on the artificiality of conditioning children to war hysteria; one on a dinner party argument over Spain, in which there is implicit a whole period of American wrong thinking. The popularity of this volume will probably be enhanced by the present vogue of Prodigal Women.

Pub Date: May 3rd, 1943
Publisher: Scribner