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THE SHOCK DOCTRINE by Naomi Klein Kirkus Star

THE SHOCK DOCTRINE

The Rise of Disaster Capitalism

By Naomi Klein

Pub Date: Sept. 18th, 2007
ISBN: 978-0-8050-7983-8
Publisher: Metropolitan/Henry Holt

Klein (Fences and Windows: Dispatches from the Front Lines of the Globalization Debate, 2002, etc.) tracks the forced imposition of economic privatization, rife with multinational corporate parasites, on areas and nations weakened by war, civil strife or natural disasters.

The author follows John Perkins (Confessions of an Economic Hit Man, 2004) and others in pointing an alarmed finger at a global “corporatocracy” that combines the worst features of big business and small government. The difference is that Klein’s book incorporates an amount of due diligence, logical structure and statistical evidence that others lack. As a result, she is persuasive when she links past and present events, including the war in Iraq and trashing of its economy, to the systematic march of laissez-faire capitalism and the downsizing of the public sector as both a worldview and a political methodology. Klein fully establishes the influence of U.S. economist Milton Friedman, who died in November 2006, as champion of the free-market transformations that occurred initially in South America, where Friedmanite minions trained at the University of Chicago in the 1960s worked their wiles on behalf of some of the 20th century’s most repressive regimes. On to China’s Tiananmen Square, then to the collapsed Soviet Union, where oligarchs soared and the underclass was left to starve in the 1990s. More recent developments include forcing private development on the tsunami-ravaged beachfronts of South Asia and junking the public-school system in favor of private charter schools in post-Katrina New Orleans. Just as provocative is Klein’s analysis of the Bush administration’s rampant outsourcing of U.S. government responsibilities, including the entire “homeland security industry,” to no-bid corporate contractors and their expense-laden chains of subcontractors. Her account of that methodology’s consequences in Iraq, as mass unemployment coincided with the disbanding of a standing army whose soldiers took their guns home, leaves little doubt as to why there is an enduring insurgency.

Required reading for anyone trying to pierce the complexities of globalization.