THE FLYING GRANDMOTHER by Naomi Kojima

THE FLYING GRANDMOTHER

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KIRKUS REVIEW

In a series of black-and-white line drawings that never quite take off, a little girl dreams of wings, gets them, flies, and fetches her fat grandmother, who finds her wings in an old trunk. Grandmother's feathers are shedding, though, and she falls into a nest--but birds help her fly home on bare wings to make repairs. Next, girl and grandmother, flying, swoop down to foil a trio of bakery thieves and end up accused of the theft themselves. . . and so make another trip to bring the thieves to justice. In the end, we see the pair twirling a globe in anticipation, then setting off, presumably on a bigger and more distant adventure. At least until the thieves show up, the strain of following the action is never interesting enough to justify it; after that, there is something of a plot to follow and much gesticulation to keep it jumping, but little in the way of wit or charm. Wings or not, it's a comedown from last year's somewhat sprightlier Mr. and Mrs. Thief.

Pub Date: Sept. 9th, 1981
Publisher: T. Y. Crowell