CRY OF THE PEACOCKS by Naomi Lazard

CRY OF THE PEACOCKS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Naomi Lazard has a place ""Among the many young poets."" Her style is full of ""vitality and lyric power...freshness...and uncommon juxtapositions"" of personal and real geographies. Her poems deal with immigrant Russian Jewish grandparents and childhood losses; with broken love affairs; with Cuba, and space capsules. So much of it seems so familiar, so similar to a great deal of recent poetry, that one tends to overlook at first the considerable skill and restraint. If Miss Lazard does not seem wholly original, she writes movingly and well within her current style. She is knowledgeable and touches upon many places and aspects of our times. Her rooms and landscapes and mood-pieces are precisely arranged, and full of a delicate sense of alienation. She is gracefully articulate, using complex language without sign of strain. If something rare and personal seems to be missing, that lack is also perhaps part of the poetry of cool sophistication, of our times, whose form she has chosen.

Pub Date: Feb. 8th, 1966
Publisher: Harcourt, Brace & World