An enthusiastic culinary tour with a personal feel and a travel-book touch to complement those Middle Eastern and...

THE FLAVOR OF JERUSALEM

From the small (pop. 300,000) ancient city where East meets West and the three major religions of the world sit down to table together, two spirited free-lancers who met while working in the office of Jerusalem Mayor Teddy Kollek (though Joan's from Providence and Judy's from Montreal) have compiled favorite recipes and personality profiles from the colorful heterogeneity of the local citizens.

You'll meet Russian nuns, Hungarian restaurateurs, Israeli archaeologists, editors, and kibbutzniks, Arab actors and antiquarians, Yemenite jewelry makers, an Ethiopian monk, a Scottish minister, a Persian policeman, Franciscan priests, and many more. They prepare marvelous couscous, falafel, hummus, Maste kheyar, Moussaka, Lahmajoun, Shish Kebab, a few odd Oriental, French or English items; but Joan and Judy are unabashedly pro-Jewish and their favorites (and ours) are kugel, blintzes, latices, matzoh balls, charoset (prepared Sephardic-style, with dates, walnuts, sweet wine), gefilte fish, challah, and rich and heavy tortes. Golda herself, by the way, brews chicken soup (don't forget the bird's feet) in the family kitchen.

An enthusiastic culinary tour with a personal feel and a travel-book touch to complement those Middle Eastern and Mitteleuropaeisch flavors.

Pub Date: March 1, 1975

ISBN: 0316598437

Page Count: 242

Publisher: N/A

Review Posted Online: Nov. 8, 2011

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Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis...

THE ELEMENTS OF STYLE

50TH ANNIVERSARY EDITION

Privately published by Strunk of Cornell in 1918 and revised by his student E. B. White in 1959, that "little book" is back again with more White updatings.

Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis (whoops — "A bankrupt expression") a unique guide (which means "without like or equal").

Pub Date: May 15, 1972

ISBN: 0205632645

Page Count: 105

Publisher: Macmillan

Review Posted Online: Oct. 28, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1972

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MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. AND THE MARCH ON WASHINGTON

This early reader is an excellent introduction to the March on Washington in 1963 and the important role in the march played by Martin Luther King Jr. Ruffin gives the book a good, dramatic start: “August 28, 1963. It is a hot summer day in Washington, D.C. More than 250,00 people are pouring into the city.” They have come to protest the treatment of African-Americans here in the US. With stirring original artwork mixed with photographs of the events (and the segregationist policies in the South, such as separate drinking fountains and entrances to public buildings), Ruffin writes of how an end to slavery didn’t mark true equality and that these rights had to be fought for—through marches and sit-ins and words, particularly those of Dr. King, and particularly on that fateful day in Washington. Within a year the Civil Rights Act of 1964 had been passed: “It does not change everything. But it is a beginning.” Lots of visual cues will help new readers through the fairly simple text, but it is the power of the story that will keep them turning the pages. (Easy reader. 6-8)

Pub Date: Jan. 1, 2001

ISBN: 0-448-42421-5

Page Count: 48

Publisher: Grosset & Dunlap

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 1, 2000

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