Nature & Travel Book Reviews

ANIMALS STRIKE CURIOUS POSES by Elena Passarello
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Feb. 28, 2017

"Passarello manages to chronicle humanity's cavalier exploitation of, and cruelty to, animals without getting preachy in the process—no mean feat. If only the entirety of the book reflected the gifts the author demonstrates at her best."
An essayist populates a bestiary of an ark with famous animals from history, all celebrated by humans even as we harnessed and exploited them. Read full book review >
DODGE CITY by Tom Clavin
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 28, 2017

"There's some rehashing of the old but much that is new, making this a must-have for buffs—nothing world-changing but a nicely spun Wild West yarn to satisfy even the most ardent consumer of oaters."
Of cowpokes, desperadoes, and the law in a Western town in which it wasn't always easy to tell which was which. Read full book review >

THE ALPS by Stephen O’Shea
HISTORY
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"This spirited jaunt into the peaks of Europe may inspire readers to pack their bags."
A tour through the Alps reveals history, geology, anthropology, and local customs. Read full book review >
FLÂNEUSE by Lauren Elkin
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"Enlightening walks through cities, cultural history, and a writer's heart and soul."
An American freelance essayist and translator living in Paris debuts with an appealing blend of memoir, scholarship, and cultural criticism. Read full book review >
SONGS OF THE BAKA AND OTHER DISCOVERIES by Dennis James
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"Travel dispatches that offer a rare perspective on a world few see so intimately."
Intrepid travelers offer a colorful report on far-flung destinations. Read full book review >

THE EDUCATION OF WILL by Patricia McConnell
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"An uplifting story of hope about how both dogs and humans need 'a sense that they are not helpless victims.'"
How training an incorrigible puppy helped an internationally renowned animal behaviorist recover from "multiple traumas." Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 21, 2017

"An inside look at the experiences of shelter dogs that is sure to appeal to dog and animal lovers."
Upbeat memoir of a dog lover who shares her insights about homeless dogs and animal shelters. Read full book review >
THE WORLD IS ELSEWHERE by Chris McIvor
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 15, 2017

"While the memoir could use more literary flair, McIvor's unique perspective as a cleareyed aid worker has value."
In the last of what he describes as a trilogy of memoirs, McIvor (In the Old Chief's Country: My Life in Zimbabwe and Other Places, 2012, etc.) documents six years of his life in several countries where he has worked for Save the Children. Read full book review >
THE TEMPORARY BRIDE by Jennifer Klinec
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"An unexpectedly moving memoir."
A Canadian-born entrepreneur recounts how she went to Iran in search of culinary adventure and fell in love. Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"An entertaining, informative guidebook to some cool places populated by people to whom attention should be paid."
A tour of the territories of the United States, "those scattered shards of earth and populace that make up our outposts far from the North American continent." Read full book review >
CANNIBALISM by Bill Schutt
HISTORY
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"One takeaway: humans don't taste like chicken. A learned, accessible, and engaging approach to a meaty—beg pardon—and always-controversial subject."
Zoologist Schutt (Biology/LIU Post; Dark Banquet: Blood and the Curious Lives of Blood-Feeding Creatures, 2008) gets to the heart of the matter of a topic that makes people shudder. Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"A spry exercise in popular science. Can you dig it?"
Explosions, fires, asteroid collisions, predators: there are good reasons to go underground for critters of many descriptions, as this lightly written, pleasant survey reveals. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Yoojin Grace Wuertz
February 27, 2017

In Yoojin Grace Wuertz’s debut novel Everything Belongs to Us, the setting is Seoul in 1978. At South Korea’s top university, the nation’s best and brightest compete to join the professional elite of an authoritarian regime. Success could lead to a life of rarefied privilege and wealth; failure means being left irrevocably behind. For childhood friends Jisun and Namin, the stakes couldn’t be more different. Jisun, the daughter of a powerful business mogul, grew up on a mountainside estate with lush gardens and a dedicated chauffeur. Namin’s parents run a tented food cart from dawn to curfew; her sister works in a shoe factory. Now Jisun wants as little to do with her father’s world as possible, abandoning her schoolwork in favor of the underground activist movement, while Namin studies tirelessly in the service of one goal: to launch herself and her family out of poverty. But everything changes when Jisun and Namin meet an ambitious, charming student named Sunam, whose need to please his family has led him to a prestigious club: the Circle. Under the influence of his mentor, Juno, a manipulative social climber, Sunam becomes entangled with both women, as they all make choices that will change their lives forever. “Engrossing,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. “Wuertz is an important new voice in American fiction.” View video >