Nature & Travel Book Reviews

THE NORDIC THEORY OF EVERYTHING by Anu Partanen
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: June 28, 2016

"An earnest, well-written work worth heeding, especially in our current toxic political climate."
A Finnish journalist offers a surprising theory of why Americans are neither currently upwardly mobile nor free. Read full book review >
JACKSON, 1964 by Calvin Trillin
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 28, 2016

"Haunting pieces that show how our window on the past is often a mirror."
A veteran reporter collects some significant pieces about race that originally appeared in the New Yorker, his publishing home since 1963. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 21, 2016

"A well-made, evenhanded, sometimes cautionary story of business, told with the affection and exasperation of an insider."
Everyone's a wiener in this frank account by a scion of hot dog nobility. Read full book review >
THIS IS WHERE YOU BELONG by Melody Warnick
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: June 21, 2016

"Well intended but unsatisfying."
Don't like where you live? Socialize. Volunteer. Make lists. Or you could just move. Read full book review >
BEING A BEAST by Charles Foster
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 21, 2016

"A splendid, vivid contribution to the literature of nature."
In which an English author, tired of the high street, takes to the fens and burrows to learn how animals live. Read full book review >

SHANGHAI GRAND by Taras Grescoe
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 14, 2016

"Grescoe exuberantly captures the glamour and intrigue of a lost world."
An intrepid journalist in free-wheeling 1930s Shanghai. Read full book review >
ALL STRANGERS ARE KIN by Zora O'Neill
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 14, 2016

"A valiant chronicle of the author's 'Year of Speaking Arabic Badly.'"
Returning to study Arabic less formally than as a college student led the author to travel through the Arab world. Read full book review >
THE FOOD AND WINE OF FRANCE by Edward Behr
FOOD & COOKING
Released: June 14, 2016

"French cuisine once was unassailable, the West's finest, but while its influence has diminished even in France—as have many of the dishes that established its reputation—French food still commands a certain fascination, and Behr explores it with appetizing ardor."
The Art of Eating magazine founder Behr (50 Foods, 2013, etc.) serves as an admirable traveling companion through the world of French cuisine, offering high sailing on gustatory seas as well as grounding in history and broader cultural concerns. Read full book review >
THE WONDER TRAIL by Steve Hely
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 14, 2016

"A disappointing book considering the ambitious journey that was undertaken and the potential for engaging a wide range of curious armchair travelers."
The author's travels from Los Angeles to Patagonia. Read full book review >
DOG GONE by Pauls Toutonghi
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 14, 2016

"Honest reflections on a beloved dog that went missing and the frantic search to find him. For more universally interesting dog stories, turn to Jon Katz."
A lost dog and the family who strived to find him. Read full book review >
KINGDOMS IN THE AIR by Bob Shacochis
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 7, 2016

"'Sink into an otherness,' the author advises in this enlightening travel collection, for a voyage of self-discovery."
Reflections on a wild life of daring travel. Read full book review >
THE HOUR OF LAND by Terry Tempest Williams
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 7, 2016

"An important, well-informed, and moving read for anyone interested in learning more about America's national parks."
In commemoration of the centennial of the National Park Service, Williams (When Women Were Birds: Fifty-four Variations on Voice, 2012, etc.) explores 12 diverse parks.Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Swan Huntley
June 27, 2016

In Swan Huntley’s debut novel We Could Be Beautiful, Catherine West has spent her entire life surrounded by beautiful things. She owns an immaculate Manhattan apartment, she collects fine art, she buys exquisite handbags and clothing, and she constantly redecorates her home. And yet, despite all this, she still feels empty. One night, at an art opening, Catherine meets William Stockton, a handsome man who shares her impeccable taste and love of beauty. He is educated, elegant, and even has a personal connection—his parents and Catherine's parents were friends years ago. But as he and Catherine grow closer, she begins to encounter strange signs, and her mother, Elizabeth (now suffering from Alzheimer’s), seems to have only bad memories of William as a boy. In Elizabeth’s old diary she finds an unnerving letter from a former nanny that cryptically reads: “We cannot trust anyone . . . “ Is William lying about his past? “Huntley’s debut stands out not for its thrills but rather for her hawkish eye for social detail and razor-sharp wit,” our reviewer writes. “An intoxicating escape; as smart as it is fun.” View video >