A ROUGH RIDE TO THE FUTURE by James Lovelock
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: April 3, 2015

"For those so inclined, this book is like getting Mother Earth News and Wired magazines in the mail on the same day."
A radical shift in thinking about climate change from Lovelock, the originator of the Gaia theory. Read full book review >
MOTORCYCLES I'VE LOVED by Lily Brooks-Dalton
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 7, 2015

"Despite the interesting details of her back story, Brooks-Dalton's journey of reinvention is disappointingly mundane and uneventful."
A travel-hungry young woman's memoir of her unexpected love affair with motorcycles. Read full book review >

PICNIC IN PROVENCE by Elizabeth Bard
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 7, 2015

"Delectable reading."
A journalist's account of the unexpectedly rich life she and her French husband made together after leaving Paris for a small town in southern France. Read full book review >
THE NEW WILD by Fred Pearce
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: April 7, 2015

"Pearce's book could use some pruning and shaping of its own, but his theme is significant: There is no going back when change is the norm."
Environmental journalist Pearce (The Land Grabbers: The New Fight over Who Owns the Earth, 2012, etc.) examines the effects of introduced species and our responses to them. Read full book review >
NO SUCH THING AS FAILURE by David Hempleman-Adams
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 7, 2015

"Solidly entertaining. Always looking for new challenges (perhaps sailing next?), he assures readers that he will 'keep [them] posted' about his adventures to come."
An account of the British adventurer's global travels: hot-air ballooning across the Atlantic, walking across the poles and climbing the highest peaks. Read full book review >

GORGE by Kara Richardson Whitely
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 7, 2015

"Disappointing despite its honesty and flair."
A physical journey up Mount Kilimanjaro and an emotional journey through a lifetime of baggage. Read full book review >
DRIVING THE FUTURE by Margo Oge
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 7, 2015

"An exhaustive, occasionally exhausting look at the long and winding road to a smart car future."
Environmental Protection Agency insider Oge meticulously recounts the political battles that have cleared the way for more intelligent, fuel-efficient transportation. Read full book review >
THE INTIMATE BOND by Brian Fagan
HISTORY
Released: April 14, 2015

"Though reminding us of the cruelties still visited upon animals and insisting that we respect them anew—not merely as pets or idealized creatures of the wild—Fagan offers no resolutions to our conflicting attitudes toward them, but his compelling, cohesive book calls for further enlightenment."
Fagan (Emeritus, Anthropology/Univ. of Calif., Santa Barbara; The Attacking Ocean: The Past, Present, and Future of Rising Sea Levels, 2013, etc.) brings consummate skill to this frequently horrifying study of humanity's interaction with animals.Read full book review >
THE BIG SWIM by Carrie Saxifrage
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 14, 2015

"A soulful and sobering memoir of climate change and personal responsibilities."
An American-born Canadian journalist contemplates mindful living in a world threatened by climate change. Read full book review >
THE END OF THE RAINY SEASON by Marian E. Lindberg
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 14, 2015

"Earnest and convoluted, Lindberg's story awards patient, adventurous readers."
The shadowy disappearance of the author's grandfather into the jungles of Brazil spurs a literary and emotional investigation. Read full book review >
FINDING SAMUEL LOWE by Paula Williams Madison
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 14, 2015

"A well-structured memoir told in brief, punchy vignettes alternating between past and present."
A spirited pursuit of her mother's roots takes one African-American woman from Jamaica to Harlem to China. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: April 14, 2015

"As ambitious as our perennial desire to discover the road less traveled, as expressionistic as Pollock's action paintings, and as poetically driven as the Beat generation, this book is equal parts mystery, journalism, poetry and bildungsroman, ultimately in search of its own American voice."
Imagine taking a road trip through Iowa with a chatty Jack Kerouac in the passenger seat and Dwight D. Eisenhower sitting impatiently beside a disinterested Jackson Pollock in the back seat. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frank Bruni
March 31, 2015

Over the last few decades, Americans have turned college admissions into a terrifying and occasionally devastating process, preceded by test prep, tutors, all sorts of stratagems, all kinds of rankings, and a conviction among too many young people that their futures will be determined and their worth established by which schools say yes and which say no. In Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be, New York Times columnist Frank Bruni explains why, giving students and their parents a new perspective on this brutal, deeply flawed competition and a path out of the anxiety that it provokes. “Written in a lively style but carrying a wallop, this is a book that family and educators cannot afford to overlook as they try to navigate the treacherous waters of college admissions,” our reviewer writes. View video >