BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 27, 2016

"A laudable effort that meets with mixed success."
The stage and screen actress delivers a memoir focused on her wildlife conservation work. Read full book review >
THE NAMES OF THE STARS by Pete Fromm
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 27, 2016

"Fromm's finely tuned reflections on this small but fully inhabited piece of the backwoods make this an adventure worth savoring."
A middle-aged novelist and creative-writing teacher spends a month in the wilderness keeping an eye on baby fish for the National Forest Service and reliving his earlier experiences in the wild. Read full book review >

THE HOME PLACE by J. Drew Lanham
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"A shrewd meditation on home, family, nature, and the author's native South."
An ornithologist writes about himself as a member of a rare and perhaps endangered species: the African-American birder. Read full book review >
DON'T THINK TWICE by Barbara Schoichet
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 6, 2016

"An all-inclusive and honest account of how one woman used a motorcycle journey to come to grips with painful events in her life."
How a cross-country motorcycle ride helped the author combat severe depression. Read full book review >
THE FORTRESS by Danielle Trussoni
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 20, 2016

"An entertaining but too predictable tale."
A handsome prince turns into an ogre in a memoir that reads like a fairy tale. Read full book review >

TASTES LIKE CHICKEN by Emelyn Rude
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Aug. 15, 2016

"All this from an author who admits, 'I am a chicken historian who does not actually like eating chicken,' but who finds the bird as fascinating as she makes it for readers."
In her first book, a food historian with a feature writer's flair illuminates the culinary history of the now-ubiquitous chicken. Read full book review >
SHAKESPEARE IN SWAHILILAND by Edward Wilson-Lee
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"Wilson-Lee enjoyably melds memoir, history, and literary travelogue to reveal the surprising hold that Shakespeare continues to have on a culture remote from his own."
Pursuing the Bard across the history, geography, and culture of East Africa. Read full book review >
SWIMMING IN THE SINK by Lynne Cox
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 6, 2016

"A simple, inspiring memoir."
An open water swimmer's memoir about how she survived a traumatic year marred by heartbreak and a life-threatening health crisis. Read full book review >
IF VENICE DIES by Salvatore Settis
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"An impassioned plea that every lover of Venice, urban planner, architect, and cultural historian should read."
Archaeologist and art historian Settis (The Future of the Classical, 2006, etc.) explores how troubled Venice is capable of being the true vision of a city. Read full book review >
SUPER SUSHI RAMEN EXPRESS by Michael Booth
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 6, 2016

"While some readers may wish for deeper explorations of some of Booth's subjects, he covers the current state of Japanese cuisine with humor and intelligence."
A British food and travel writer takes his wife, two young sons, and a bubbly brand of humor to Japan in hopes of examining the food culture and losing a few of the pounds he has picked up living and cooking in Paris. Read full book review >
RANCHER, FARMER, FISHERMAN by Miriam Horn
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 6, 2016

"An optimistic journal of promise for the future and a supremely motivational text for readers interested in Earth's compromised biodiversity."
Journalistic portraits of pioneering farmers, harvesters, and conservationists unafraid to fight for the protection of the American landscapes they cultivate. Read full book review >
OH, FLORIDA! by Craig Pittman
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: July 5, 2016

"An inviting tour through Florida's personality and the colorful characters that make it up."
A chronicle of the eccentric, enigmatic nature of the state of Florida. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Chris Cleave
June 14, 2016

In bestseller Chris Cleave’s latest novel Everyone Brave Is Forgiven, it’s London, 1939. The day war is declared, Mary North leaves finishing school unfinished, goes straight to the War Office, and signs up. Tom Shaw decides to ignore the war—until he learns his roommate Alistair Heath has unexpectedly enlisted. Then the conflict can no longer be avoided. Young, bright, and brave, Mary is certain she’d be a marvelous spy. When she is—bewilderingly—made a teacher, she finds herself defying prejudice to protect the children her country would rather forget. Tom, meanwhile, finds that he will do anything for Mary. And when Mary and Alistair meet, it is love, as well as war, that will test them in ways they could not have imagined, entangling three lives in violence and passion, friendship and deception, inexorably shaping their hopes and dreams. “Among all the recent fictions about the war, Cleave’s miniseries of a novel is a surprising standout,” our reviewer writes, “with irresistibly engaging characters who sharply illuminate issues of class, race, and wartime morality.” View video >