THE TIDE by Hugh Aldersey-Williams
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Sept. 20, 2016

"An engaging exploration of the profound historical relationship between science and culture, written in a lively style with clear scientific explanations."
An exploration of "the discovery and science of the cosmic rhythm that governs our planet." Read full book review >
THE STORY OF THE WORLD IN 100 SPECIES by Christopher Lloyd
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 27, 2016

"A good fit for middle and high school libraries as a useful reference."
An encyclopedic history of the emergence of life on Earth that "traces the history of life from the dawn of evolution to the present day through the lens of one hundred living things that have changed the world." Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 4, 2016

"Levy's spirited history is nothing less than a love letter to Rome's luxurious, sensational past."
A cultural history reveals an effervescent decade of riches in postwar Rome. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 25, 2016

"An insightful book that should be of interest to anyone who eats food, animal or not."
Unsentimental study of the dangers in how meat is produced and distributed around the world, particularly in the United States. Read full book review >
STORIES FROM AFIELD by Bruce L. Smith
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 2016

"Reflective thoughts and vibrant specifics bring a nature biologist's love of the outdoors to readers."
A wildlife biologist shares some of his adventures in the field. Read full book review >

BEING A DOG by Alexandra Horowitz
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Oct. 4, 2016

"Dog owners curious about the lives of their pets will savor this book, but it deserves a wider audience than just animal lovers."
If the olfactory ability of dogs seems like a dull topic, be prepared for a surprise. This engrossing book takes on not just canine noses, but what we can do with our own—with a little experience and a good guide. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 27, 2016

"A lovingly written book that should appeal to most city dwellers and all tree lovers."
A comprehensive look at the trees of American cities. Read full book review >
AND THE MONKEY LEARNED NOTHING by Tom Lutz
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 2016

"A travel memoir with short, provocative, occasionally inscrutable entries that will eventually tire even armchair travelers."
Postcards from around the globe, far from the beaten path of tourism. Read full book review >
TREEHAB by Bob Smith
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 27, 2016

"A truth-telling tour conducted by an agile guide."
The first openly gay comedian to perform on the Tonight Show delivers a collection of witty essays exploring his remarkable career and life. Read full book review >
VIETNAM by Christopher Goscha
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"A vigorous, eye-opening account of a country of great importance to the world, past and future."
America was not the first world power to meet defeat in far-distant Vietnam. The reasons for that loss emerge from this welcome overview of that nation's history. Read full book review >
ALL THE KREMLIN'S MEN by Mikhail Zygar
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 6, 2016

"Certainly for Kremlinologists but also for readers wishing to better understand how Putin's Russia has come to look so much like the old Soviet Union."
A veteran journalist and former editor-in-chief of Russia's only independent TV news station paints a revealing group portrait of the entourage influencing Vladimir Putin. Read full book review >
FAMILY OF EARTH by Wilma Dykeman
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 6, 2016

"A captivating, poetic, difficult-to-categorize book that abundantly showcases the author's talent for making words dance. Anyone who has lived in the countryside, or wished they had, will enjoy Dykeman's celebration of nature."
The first publication of a long-lost work by revered Appalachian writer Dykeman (1920-2006). Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nancy Isenberg
author of WHITE TRASH
July 19, 2016

Poor Americans have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlement. They were alternately known as “waste people,” “offals,” “rubbish,” “lazy lubbers,” and “crackers.” By the 1850s, the downtrodden included so-called “clay eaters” and “sandhillers,” known for prematurely aged children distinguished by their yellowish skin, ragged clothing, and listless minds. Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over 400 years, in White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America, Nancy Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society––where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. “A riveting thesis supported by staggering research,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >