Nature & Travel Book Reviews (page 199)

NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: March 29, 1999

"Admittedly, there is material here that falls a few sparks short of explosive—the scant depth of the rufous piha's nest, for example—but Skutch always invests his findings with the high purpose of bell-clear scholarship, even when of the footnote variety. (27 line drawings)"
Skutch (A Naturalist Amid Tropical Splendor, 1987, etc.) has had the chance, the curiosity, and the resolve—for over 70 years—to observe the habits of little-known tropical birds, and the gleanings here add random, intelligent insights to our stock of avian wonder. Read full book review >
GARDENS OF REMEMBRANCE by Thomas McCarthy
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: March 26, 1999

"Lacking organization, focus, and depth, this book is a bland mixture of incompatible ingredients tossed haphazardly into a pot."
A forgettable hodgepodge of childhood memoir, travel diary, and essays on poetry. Read full book review >

ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: March 8, 1999

"He brings a bright, childlike eagerness to these days on the stream or in the field and forest, burnishing their memory with thoughtfulness and elegance. (illustrations, not seen)"
Few sports can boast as many old-fangled pleasures as camping and its related activities, and Dennis (The River Home: An Angler's Explorations, 1998, etc.) beckoningly delineates many of them in these light, silky essays. Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: March 3, 1999

"And lest he forget their essential wildness, a little bite—a modest puncture 'a half-inch square and three-quarters-inch deep''serves to remind him. (42 b&w photos) (Book-of-the-Month/Quality Paperback Book Club selection)"
You know you're a bear when heaven is a rotten log full of grubs and ants. Read full book review >
RIDING THE DEMON by Peter Chilson
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: March 1, 1999

"If Issoufou offered Chilson 'a buffet spread of a nation's economy and politics,' Chilson in turns offers it to us, seen through the dark and scary glass of the road."
The raw cultural, political, and economic vitality of West Africa is sought by newcomer Chilson upon Niger's lawless, hair-raising, fickle, murderous—in a word, insane—roads. Read full book review >

THE TULIP by Anna Pavord
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: March 1, 1999

"This floral portrait is alive with wonder; even the concluding catalogue raisonnÇ of species is a work of passion."
A disarming, captivating history of the tulip—a byzantine story rich in subtexts, from Pavord, gardening correspondent for the Independent in England (The Flowering Year, not reviewed, etc.). Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: March 1, 1999

"The biological essentialism and mechanistic view of cultural activities propounded by Stanford here is not likely to sway many of the critics who wished to discredit the Man the Hunter model in the first place, but may find favor with those inclined toward sociobiology."
An unabashed celebration of the carnivorous tendencies of early humankind. Read full book review >
ROYAL COACHMAN by Paul Schullery
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: March 1, 1999

"In a literature so abounding in snobs and reverse snobs, Schullery comes like a blast of fresh air, an iconoclast with an inclusive spirit that Whitman would have admired."
Schullery (Searching for Yellowstone: Ecology and Wonder in the Last Wilderness, 1997, etc.), an inveterate ferreter of fly- fishing's deep past, serves up more arcana and opinions for the sport's devout. Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: March 1, 1999

"An entrancing summary of what is known and conjectured about tornadoes, from a man who has been running after them for over 20 years. (67 color, 44 b&w photos, 50 illustrations, not seen)"
Radical-event meteorologist Bluestein (Univ. of Oklahoma) depicts with paint-by-number clarity (albeit with a more delicately shaded and elegant end product) the lives and quirky personalities of severe storms, particularly tornadoes. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: March 1, 1999

Fagan (Time Detectives, 1995, etc.) draws on his archaeology background to intriguingly explore the correlation between unusual climatic shifts and unusual historical events. Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: March 1, 1999

"Kunzig's flair should stir readers' awe and allow them to share in his protective urge."
In this spirited and engaging book, science writer Kunzig, an editor at Discover magazine, voyages among oceanographers, alive and departed, from dockside to textbook, and reports back on our current understanding, and often dubious treatment, of the world's oceans. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: March 1, 1999

"Meloy has not only rediscovered her connection to the badlands'she's also made a fine book in the bargain. (Author tour)"
A thoughtful recounting of one woman's travels in the post—Cold War American West. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kathleen Kent
author of THE DIME
February 20, 2017

Dallas, Texas is not for the faint of heart. Good thing for Betty Rhyzyk she's from a family of take-no-prisoners Brooklyn police detectives. But in Kathleen Kent’s new novel The Dime, her Big Apple wisdom will only get her so far when she relocates to The Big D, where Mexican drug cartels and cult leaders, deadbeat skells and society wives all battle for sunbaked turf. Betty is as tough as the best of them, but she's deeply shaken when her first investigation goes sideways. Battling a group of unruly subordinates, a persistent stalker, a formidable criminal organization, and an unsupportive girlfriend, the unbreakable Detective Betty Rhyzyk may be reaching her limit. “Violent, sexy, and completely absorbing,” our critic writes in a starred review. “Kent's detective is Sam Spade reincarnated—as a brilliant, modern woman.” View video >