Nature & Travel Book Reviews (page 199)

NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: April 1, 1994

"Lively and engaging, if sometimes too earnest and self- indulgent, this is a good graduation present for those Generation X-ers who can afford to be nonmaterialistic these days."
In a sort of nouveau Dharma Bums, drifting in and out of Bay Area counterculture and the High Sierra, young Californian Duane combines a climber's journal with a memoir of the year following his graduation from Cornell. Read full book review >
WILDERNESS MOTHER by Deanna Kawatski
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: April 1, 1994

"Bruisingly honest, rich in the details of daily life, but with a paucity of insight that would give deeper meaning to this adventure. (B&w photographs—not seen)"
This is an unevenly told personal account of a woman who married and raised two children in the Canadian wilderness. Read full book review >

ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: April 1, 1994

"Of value to poets as well as anthropologists, the book also holds universal appeal through the compelling way Inuit symbols and traditions are brought to life, illuminating humanity's cycle of dark, wintry dreams and hopes of plenty in the spring."
In this gripping study of the Alaskan Inuit people, British poet Lowenstein narrates Tikigag (Point Hope) seasonal rituals and each year's culmination—the spring hunt for the bowhead whale. Read full book review >
DANCES WITH TROUT by John Gierach
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: April 1, 1994

"Informative and sassy, these well-crafted gems sparkle even in a genre known for quality writing. (Illustrated by Glenn Wolff—not seen)"
The lure of fly-fishing by a delightful essayist who's becoming one of the most popular and respected angling writers in the country. Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: April 1, 1994

"At the same time, he underscores the difficulties scientists face in attempting to breed endangered species in captivity and reintroduce them to the wild, especially when native habitat is lost."
An environmental reporter for The Philadelphia Inquirer tells the mysterious tale of the sudden disappearance of birds on the Pacific island of Guam in his first book. Read full book review >

NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: April 1, 1994

"Interesting history of Turkmenistan and horses, but an awfully long and condescending account of a man's failed dream."
This plodding tale of Maslow's adventure to Russia's Turkmenistan in search of an exotic horse is salvaged only by the historical filler. Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: April 1, 1994

"A pleasure to read, although most readers won't be sorry to have missed the trip. (Eight pages of photos—not seen)"
Tales from the mean side of Denali, from a young freelancer with a fast-growing reputation for writing fine climbing stories. Read full book review >
GOING UP COUNTRY by John Coyne
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 9, 1994

"Immensely diverse, often clever, unfailingly gripping as volunteers reach through barriers of tradition and culture to touch other lives, while a series of epiphanies blows their minds clear as a moonscape."
Novelist Coyne (Child of Shadows, Fury, etc.), once a Peace Corps volunteer in Ethiopia, edits a sheaf of lively essays close to his heart. Read full book review >
ZEPHYR by Henry Kisor
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: March 1, 1994

"Presented as a microcosm in the tradition of Ship of Fools, this seems, rather, a petty and misogynistic take on the worthless passengers riding a great train served by a caring and conscientious crew."
Kisor (What's That Pig Outdoors?, 1990) records his adventures on the California Zephyr, the legendary transcontinental train from Chicago to L.A. Kisor loves the train, the crew, the chefs, the porters, and the lore of the train that ranges from an odd sexual encounter in the baggage car to the effect of altitude on Alzheimer's, from train crashes and criminals to the history of dining cars. Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: March 1, 1994

"Minimally dressed, it could be quite catching."
Casting his line in the wilds of the Blue Mountains of Oregon, fly fisherman Leeson (contributing editor, Fly Rod & Reel; English/Oregon State Univ.) is in his element; but as the Spinoza of the Umpqua he crashes and burns. Read full book review >
CRITTERS by A.B.C. Whipple
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: March 1, 1994

"Of particular interest to those with an appreciation—and a soft spot—for backyard fauna. (Eleven lovely line drawings accompany the text)"
Primarily known as the author of numerous naval history books (To the Shores of Tripoli, 1991, etc.), Whipple turns his attention here to an investigation—via both firsthand observation and research—of the local wildlife that live in and about his Greenwich, Connecticut, neighborhood. Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"Gardeners need not fear a sprinkerless future; as Christopher points out, xeriscaping by no means equals zero-scaping. (Twenty- four pp. of color photographs—not seen.)"
Let there be drought, proclaims Christopher (In Search of Lost Roses, 1989); let your garden bloom. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Bill Browder
author of RED NOTICE
March 24, 2015

Bill Browder’s Red Notice is a nonfiction political thriller about an American financier in the Wild East of Russia, the murder of his principled young tax attorney, and his mission to expose the Kremlin’s corruption. In 2007, a group of Russian law enforcement officers raided Browder’s offices in Moscow and stole $230 million of taxes that his fund’s companies had paid to the Russian government. Browder’s attorney Sergei Magnitsky investigated the incident and uncovered a sprawling criminal enterprise. A month after Sergei testified against the officials involved, he was arrested and thrown into pre-trial detention, where he was tortured for a year. On November 16, 2009, he was led to an isolation chamber, handcuffed to a bedrail, and beaten to death by eight guards in full riot gear. “It may be that ‘Russian stories never have happy endings,’ ” our reviewer writes about Red Notice, “but Browder’s account more than compensates by ferociously unmasking Putin’s thugocracy.” View video >