Nature & Travel Book Reviews (page 199)

ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Jan. 1, 1999

"Going cosmic is not his gift."
A renowned wildlife tracker discovers the web of life and invites readers—through I-am-one- with-nature zenning—to experience the truth of his way. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 1, 1999

"Readers with an interest in such things will find value in Byford's pages."
A homespun celebration of the Tennessee woodlands. Read full book review >

THE ORCHID THIEF by Susan Orlean
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 1999

"As for everyone else, there's little or no narrative drive to keep all the facts and mini-narratives flowing. (Author tour)"
Expanded from a New Yorker article, this long-winded if well-informed tale has less to do with John Laroche, the "thief," than it does with our author's desire to craft a comprehensive natural and social history of what the Victorians called "orchidelirium." Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Dec. 1, 1998

"The creatures themselves are truth, and reason, enough. (line drawings)"
A savory collection of natural history entertainments from Conniff (Spineless Wonders: Strange Tales from the Invertebrate World, 1996), who shares much with one of his subjects, the weasel—both being "very curious, investigative creatures." Read full book review >
THE LIFE OF BIRDS by David Attenborough
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Dec. 1, 1998

"Experienced amateur ornithologists are unlikely to find anything new here, but the volume does offer a useful (and superbly illustrated) introduction to bird life for those with little background in the field."
The indefatigable Attenborough (The First Eden: The Mediterranean World and Man, 1987, etc.), the driving force behind many nature documentaries, has written a book to accompany his forthcoming 10-part PBS series on the varied, complex, and fascinating world of birds, which will air in the spring of 1999. Read full book review >

NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Nov. 30, 1998

"A writer of skillful means and economy, Deming doesn't enter such terrain lightly, nor does she trifle with it: —What I am calling for is an ecology of culture in which we look for and foster our relatedness across disciplinary lines without forgetting our differences.' (Author tour)"
Poet Deming (Temporary Homelands, 1994) heads selectively for sundry outbacks in the hope of tapping wisdom from them on the prospects for our wild and open lands. Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Nov. 2, 1998

"Carson devotees will already be familiar with some of this material; the more casual (if no less admiring) fan will find in this collection an engaging glimpse into the breadth of Carson's curiosity and the fashioning of her public voice as a defender of the environment."
Biographer Lear (Rachel Carson: Witness for Nature, 1997) knits together here a number of Rachel Carson's writings—often much more personal, quirky, and searching than her celebrated books—that add meat to her body of literary/scientific writing. Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Nov. 1, 1998

"As a result, McElroy and her fellow testamentarians' souls can get wearying, as can the mild epiphanies that allow them to become ever worthier and more intimate with the animals."
McElroy (Animals as Teachers and Healers, not reviewed) celebrates "the lessons learned at the four-footed threshold," where animals point to "a particularly rich and rewarding track to personal awareness and to a more genuine and soul-filled life." Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Nov. 1, 1998

"It is dispiriting, though, that so vibrant a meta-analysis'such provocative fun and polished wit—finds that 'the time when dinosaurs ruled the earth is now, and their rule is synonymous with the global dominance of American culture.' (illustrations)"
A cultural-historical reading of the dinosaur's image from its discovery in the 1840s to its current media superstar status as popular icon, from Mitchell (Engish and Art/Univ. of Chicago). Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Nov. 1, 1998

"Not on a par with Chatwin or Raban, but a pleasant read for the armchair adventurer."
Expatriate Australian writer-photographer Perrottet seeks to escape his East Village apartment in Manhattan by paying periodic visits to the world's last frontiers. Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Nov. 1, 1998

"With a few fine exceptions, then, here's the nature essay at its most quaint and rhapsodic, from empurpled pens."
paper 0-306-45992-2 Manguel's (A History of Reading, 1996, etc.) collection of natural history essays is overburdened with selections from Victorian Englishmen, with a smattering of odd gems to sustain the reader's interest. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 16, 1998

"The lesson less practiced polar explorers might take away is: stay home and read this book."
A classic of outdoor adventure that, although a little dry by today's post-Krakauer standards, remains powerful. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Clinton Kelly
January 9, 2017

Bestselling author and television host Clinton Kelly’s memoir I Hate Everyone Except You is a candid, deliciously snarky collection of essays about his journey from awkward kid to slightly-less-awkward adult. Clinton Kelly is probably best known for teaching women how to make their butts look smaller. But in I Hate Everyone, Except You, he reveals some heretofore-unknown secrets about himself, like that he’s a finicky connoisseur of 1980s pornography, a disillusioned critic of New Jersey’s premier water parks, and perhaps the world’s least enthused high-school commencement speaker. Whether he’s throwing his baby sister in the air to jumpstart her cheerleading career or heroically rescuing his best friend from death by mud bath, Clinton leaps life’s social hurdles with aplomb. With his signature wit, he shares his unique ability to navigate the stickiest of situations, like deciding whether it’s acceptable to eat chicken wings with a fork on live television (spoiler: it’s not). “A thoroughly light and entertaining memoir,” our critic writes. View video >