Nature & Travel Book Reviews (page 2)

MEET ME IN ATLANTIS by Mark Adams
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 10, 2015

"Fact or fiction, Atlantis, as the author ably demonstrates, still has the power to enthrall inquiring minds."
Fun, enthusiastic exploration of the fabled lost city of Atlantis and the fascinating group of diverse personalities who have dedicated their lives to proving its existence. Read full book review >
THE LAST UNICORN by William deBuys
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 10, 2015

"A riveting and disturbing account of the clash between the beauty of the wilderness and civilization's unrelenting demands on the natural world."
Dedicated conservationist deBuys (A Great Aridness: Climate Change and the Future of the American Southwest, 2011 etc.) undertakes an arduous trek through the wilds of central Laos in a quest to help save one of the most elusive animals on the planet, the large grazing mammal known as a saola.Read full book review >

NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: March 10, 2015

"Armchair storm chasers will find much to savor in this grippingly detailed, real-time chronicle of nature gone awry."
A wind-swept re-creation of a deadly meteorological catastrophe conveyed through the perspectives of those who survived it. Read full book review >
AMERICAN VANDAL by Roy Morris Jr.
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 10, 2015

"A brisk narrative and sensitive insights make this book a delight."
The story of the beloved American novelist's nearly 12 years abroad. Read full book review >
THE AGE OF SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT by Jeffrey D. Sachs
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 10, 2015

"Required reading for policymakers and students, and general readers will finish the book realizing they actually understand what sustainable development is all about."
A leading economist offers a brilliant analysis of the worldwide need to balance economic development and environmental sustainability. Read full book review >

FOOD & COOKING
Released: March 9, 2015

"Provocative though unlikely to reach far beyond the choir box."
A condemnatory look at the factory-farming model that has overpopulated the planet with too many cattle, to the detriment of all involved. Read full book review >
H IS FOR HAWK by Helen Macdonald
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 3, 2015

"Whether you call this a personal story or nature writing, it's poignant, thoughtful and moving—and likely to become a classic in either genre."
An inspired, beautiful and absorbing account of a woman battling grief—with a goshawk. Read full book review >
RIDING HOME by Tim Hayes
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: March 3, 2015

"An educational analysis of the bonds between horses and humans and how they can 'bring feelings of self-awareness, joy, wonder, humility, and peace of mind.'"
Exploration of the healing relationship between humans and horses. Read full book review >
THE FAULT LINE by Paolo Rumiz
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 3, 2015

"A richly detailed journey into Europe's dark past and vulnerable present."
An award-winning Italian journalist chronicles his travels along Europe's eastern frontier. Read full book review >
BECOMING A MOUNTAIN by Stephen Alter
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 3, 2015

"There are many treasures to discover in this insightful memoir of hiking and healing in the Himalayas."
With a naturalist's eye and a poet's pen, a victim of violence looks to the Himalayas for healing. Read full book review >
SO, HOW LONG HAVE YOU BEEN NATIVE? by Alexis C. Bunten
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 2015

"This 'Tour Guide Confidential' just doesn't have quite the same zest as other memoirs of this nature."
A memoir about working as a cultural tour guide in rural Alaska. Read full book review >
CLIMATE SHOCK by Gernot Wagner
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 1, 2015

"Specialized and a touch rarified but useful for policy workers in helping shape dollars-and-cents arguments about the environment and global climate."
"Most everything we know tells us climate change is bad. Most everything we don't know tells us it's probably much worse." So observe Environmental Defense Fund economist Wagner (But Will the Planet Notice?: How Smart Economics Can Save the World, 2011, etc.) and Weitzman (Economics/Harvard Univ.; Income, Wealth, and the Maximum Principle, 2003, etc.) in this dismal-science look at a very dismal subject indeed.Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frank Bruni
March 31, 2015

Over the last few decades, Americans have turned college admissions into a terrifying and occasionally devastating process, preceded by test prep, tutors, all sorts of stratagems, all kinds of rankings, and a conviction among too many young people that their futures will be determined and their worth established by which schools say yes and which say no. In Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be, New York Times columnist Frank Bruni explains why, giving students and their parents a new perspective on this brutal, deeply flawed competition and a path out of the anxiety that it provokes. “Written in a lively style but carrying a wallop, this is a book that family and educators cannot afford to overlook as they try to navigate the treacherous waters of college admissions,” our reviewer writes. View video >