Nature & Travel Book Reviews (page 2)

CANNIBALISM by Bill Schutt
HISTORY
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"One takeaway: humans don't taste like chicken. A learned, accessible, and engaging approach to a meaty—beg pardon—and always-controversial subject."
Zoologist Schutt (Biology/LIU Post; Dark Banquet: Blood and the Curious Lives of Blood-Feeding Creatures, 2008) gets to the heart of the matter of a topic that makes people shudder. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"A quick and instructive read for readers with a casual interest in this quickly changing company as well as those fascinated by the fates of startups."
A fast-moving, well-researched account of the founding and surprising growth of home-sharing company Airbnb. Read full book review >

THE NATURE FIX by Florence Williams
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"A thoughtful, refreshing book with a simple but powerful message: 'Go outside, often, sometimes in wild places. Bring friends or not. Breathe.'"
A journalist explores the relationship between nature and human well-being. Read full book review >
NO BARRIERS by Erik Weihenmayer
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"A wonderful tribute to the greatness of the human spirit."
The first blind man to climb Mount Everest narrates his kayaking descent of 300 miles of the Colorado River through the Grand Canyon. Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"A plausible and provocative hypothesis on how methods of memorization may have laid the groundwork for many mysterious extant monuments."
A thought-provoking theory on "memory palaces" and their significance to ancient ancestral civilizations. Read full book review >

THE BOOK THAT CHANGED AMERICA by Randall Fuller
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 24, 2017

"A fresh, invigorating history of philosophical and political struggles."
A vibrant history of the reception of Charles Darwin's ideas by American minds and spirits. Read full book review >
LIFE AT SEA by Monique Layton
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 20, 2017

"An eccentric but enthralling look at the human conquest of the sea."
A wide-ranging account of the history of seafaring that incorporates economic, political, and sociological commentary. Read full book review >
THE UNSETTLERS by Mark Sundeen
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 10, 2017

"Provocative reading for anyone who has ever yearned for a life of radical simplicity."
Bright update on the perennial back-to-the-land movement. Read full book review >
THE LOST CITY OF THE MONKEY GOD by Douglas Preston
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Jan. 3, 2017

"A story that moves from thrilling to sobering, fascinating to downright scary—trademark Preston, in other words, and another winner."
"Once again I had the strong feeling, when flying into the valley, that I was leaving the twenty-first century entirely": another perilous Preston (The Kraken Project, 2014, etc.) prestidigitation. Read full book review >
THE FLOOD YEAR 1927 by Susan Scott Parrish
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 1, 2017

"As a cubist might, Parrish paints a multifaceted portrait of catastrophe: sometimes puzzling, often surprising, and wholly original."
A scholar's cross-disciplinary look back at the little-remembered greatest natural disaster in American history. Read full book review >
THE WOOD FOR THE TREES by Richard Fortey
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 7, 2016

"An eloquent, eccentric, and precise nature memoir."
A distinguished British paleontologist offers a meticulously compiled "biography" of four acres of woodland in Oxfordshire, England. Read full book review >
THE MARCHES by Rory Stewart
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 22, 2016

"Another winner from a consistently engaging author."
The author's journey along Hadrian's Wall, which allowed him "to explore and answer questions about Scottish nationalism, Rome, Frontiers, and Empires." Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Brad Parks
author of SAY NOTHING
March 7, 2017

In Brad Parks’ new thriller Say Nothing, judge Scott Sampson doesn’t brag about having a perfect life, but the evidence is clear: a prestigious job. A beloved family. On an ordinary Wednesday afternoon, he is about to pick up his six-year-old twins to go swimming when his wife, Alison, texts him that she’ll get the kids from school instead. It’s not until she gets home later that Scott realizes she doesn’t have the children. And she never sent the text. Then the phone rings, and every parent’s most chilling nightmare begins. A man has stolen Sam and Emma. For Scott and Alison, the kidnapper’s call is only the beginning of a twisting, gut-churning ordeal of blackmail, deceit, and terror; a high-profile trial like none the judge or his wife has ever experienced. Their marriage falters. Suspicions and long-buried jealousies rise to the surface. Fractures appear. Lies are told. “The nerve-shredding never lets up for a minute as Parks picks you up by the scruff of the neck, shakes you vigorously, and repeats over and over again till a climax so harrowing that you’ll be shaking with gratitude that it’s finally over,” our critic writes in a starred review. View video >