Nature & Travel Book Reviews (page 2)

PEAKS ON THE HORIZON by Charlie Carroll
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 10, 2015

"A gripping, enlightening journey."
An English traveler examines the occupation of Tibet firsthand while crossing paths with a Tibetan refugee whose life exemplifies that conflict. Read full book review >
DISPLACEMENT by Lucy Knisley
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 8, 2015

"A moving but also very funny meditation on time, age and grace."
A 20-something cartoonist with a unique sense of humor sets off on a cruise to the Caribbean with her nonagenarian grandparents. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 3, 2015

"A meticulously detailed feat of rare footage inside the DPRK's propaganda machinery."
Exhaustively researched, highly engrossing chronicle of the outrageous abduction of a pair of well-known South Korean filmmakers by the nefarious network of North Korea's Kim Jong-Il. Read full book review >
THE ALMOST NEARLY PERFECT PEOPLE by Michael Booth
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Feb. 1, 2015

"Blithely reporting on the many quirks in dress (Norwegian dirndls), food (an odiferous Icelandic fish specialty) and excessive drinking (everywhere) that he encountered on his journeys, Booth offers an affectionate, observant, engaging look at Scandinavia, where trust, modesty and equality proudly prevail."
A shrewd look at Nordic life. Read full book review >
SHENANDOAH by Sue Eisenfeld
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 1, 2015

"Eisenfeld writes about Shenandoah the way Annie Proulx writes about Wyoming or Edward Abbey about the deserts of the Southwest: pristine, unsentimental, eloquent prose."
A complicated history of conservation. Read full book review >

THE ITALIANS by John Hooper
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 29, 2015

"A thoroughly researched, well-written, ageless narrative of a fascinating people."
A compact but comprehensive study of the people of Italy. Read full book review >
THE GLOW OF PARIS by Gary Zuercher
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Jan. 15, 2015

"A superb pictorial evocation of the City of Light, full of dazzling images and intriguing lore."
Pictures of Seine River bridges frame nighttime views of the French capital in this striking coffee-table collection of photographs. Read full book review >
EVERY SECRET THING by Christopher Bartley
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Dec. 18, 2014

"Another solid, entertaining noir thriller from Bartley."
In Bartley's (A Bullet to Dream of, 2014, etc.) latest historical novel, a 1930s gangster with a conscience finds himself tangled up in big small-town mysteries involving murder, drugs and—most dangerous of all—young love.Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 9, 2014

"Amusing and candid stories of a rich life lived in the natural world."
Field and Stream editor-at-large Heavey (It's Only Slow Food Until You Try to Eat It: Misadventures of a Suburban Hunter-Gatherer, 2014, etc.) compiles another group of humorous and thought-provoking essays on what it means to be an outdoorsman.Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Dec. 9, 2014

"For readers with a strong interest in environmental and public health and food safety policy, this may be one of the most important books of the year."
A thorough examination of industrial chemicals in our food chain by an acclaimed French journalist and documentary filmmaker. Read full book review >
WHY DID THE CHICKEN CROSS THE WORLD? by Andrew Lawler
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Dec. 2, 2014

"A splendid book full of obsessive travel and research in history, mythology, archaeology, biology, literature and religion."
The title tells all in this comprehensive account of how an anti-social south Asian fowl became the world's favorite food. Read full book review >
THE CARRY HOME by Gary Ferguson
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 11, 2014

"A sprawling, lovely, nourishing tonic for all those who dip into it."
A eulogy to the too-early passing of the author's mate and a chronicle of the "[f]ive treks to five unshackled landscapes" to scatter her ashes. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frank Bruni
March 31, 2015

Over the last few decades, Americans have turned college admissions into a terrifying and occasionally devastating process, preceded by test prep, tutors, all sorts of stratagems, all kinds of rankings, and a conviction among too many young people that their futures will be determined and their worth established by which schools say yes and which say no. In Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be, New York Times columnist Frank Bruni explains why, giving students and their parents a new perspective on this brutal, deeply flawed competition and a path out of the anxiety that it provokes. “Written in a lively style but carrying a wallop, this is a book that family and educators cannot afford to overlook as they try to navigate the treacherous waters of college admissions,” our reviewer writes. View video >