Nature & Travel Book Reviews (page 200)

A BREATH FROM ELSEWHERE by Mirabel Osler
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: March 1, 1999

"To watch her thumb her nose at the bullies with such flair, and with such gratifying results, is an inspiration."
There are many rooms and seasons in Osler's (A Gentle Plea for Chaos, 1998) garden: alternatives proliferate in the measure of its days, uncertainties mingle with felicities, there is restoration and ferment, there may even be potential for a decaying piano amid the willows and tall grasses. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 1999

"It is all very real and unenviable and touched with the small gestures—his father's protective shoulder to cry upon, a daughter's delight in his return—that encourage survival."
Novelist Williams (Blue Crystal, 1993, etc.) presents twined, elemental stories on the havoc of a heart operation and the random, filigreed thoughts of an amateur naturalist exploring his home patch. Read full book review >

AMERICANS VIEW THEIR DUST BOWL EXPERIENCE by John R. Wunder
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 1, 1999

"Still, a useful resource compiled by three academics for students of American history, particularly concerning the rise of the populist political movement. (8 b&w photos, 2 line drawings, 13 maps, not seen)"
A mixed bag of modern historical essays and contemporary journalistic accounts of the 1930s Dust Bowl. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Feb. 1, 1999

"Of interest to students of Western American resource issues, as well as of grassroots political organizing."
paper 0-8032-6397-X An illuminating study of local resistance to a huge federal water project. Read full book review >
SIBERIAN DAWN by Jeffrey Tayler
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 1, 1999

"Graphically describes the deeply disturbing state of the 'new' Russia and its demoralized citizens."
A young American's encounters with arctic cold, violent vodka-induced drunkenness, unknown levels of radiation, and mafia-ruled hinterland cities reveal the bleak and desperate side of life in the post-Communist Soviet states. Read full book review >

NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Feb. 1, 1999

"There is an annoying aura of self-promotion at play, which detracts from the good deeds and alienates those who otherwise might have been inspired by the sanctuary's achievements. (88 b&w photos, not seen) (Book-of-the-Month Club/Quality Paperback Book Club selection)"
Inmate stories from an animal rescue sanctuary, heartening but also scolding and righteous, from sanctuary director Cuny. Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Feb. 1, 1999

"He may be an expert in animal behavior, but he's clearly not a moral philosopher."
Can the study of cooperation in animals facilitate human sociability, asks evolutionary biologist Dugatkin? Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Feb. 1, 1999

"Naveen knows and loves his subject—he is the first to admit that he is never happier than when mired in penguin guano—and he writes of it and its place with uncommon fluency. (color photos, not seen)"
Their behavior might be comedic for us, but for penguins it translates into sex, food, and turf warfare, as explained by field researcher Naveen in this tenderhearted profile of the short-feathered denizens of the far south. Read full book review >
CRAZY FOR RIVERS by Bill Barich
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Feb. 1, 1999

"In Barich's hands, the fish story exists as a state of grace."
Barich (Big Dreams: Into the Heart of California, 1994, etc.) returns to the trout stream, and it's high time. Read full book review >
OPEN SKIES, CLOSED MINDS by Nick Pope
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Jan. 27, 1999

"An odd, unconvincing statement of belief from a government official. (8 pages b&w photos)"
As a career civil servant with Britain's Ministry of Defence, Pope served a three-year stint in the early 1990s as chief investigator of UFO sightings in the United Kingdom. Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Jan. 25, 1999

"But his meticulously gathered, cogently delivered evidence will quash any arguments to the contrary."
A scholarly, exhaustive, and utterly convincing refutation of the notion that human homosexuality is an aberration in nature. Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Jan. 19, 1999

"For the artful, guileless Arms, one senses it comes down to the migratory urge, what he calls the 'oughtness' of wandering, in his case over big water, where he can 'focus on today and embrace the journey as if it were all of life.'"
Arms (Riddle of the Ice: A Scientific Adventure in the Arctic, p. 29) offers here some notes toward understanding sailors' profession to the sea and how they interpret that water world and their place in the brine. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kathleen Kent
author of THE DIME
February 20, 2017

Dallas, Texas is not for the faint of heart. Good thing for Betty Rhyzyk she's from a family of take-no-prisoners Brooklyn police detectives. But in Kathleen Kent’s new novel The Dime, her Big Apple wisdom will only get her so far when she relocates to The Big D, where Mexican drug cartels and cult leaders, deadbeat skells and society wives all battle for sunbaked turf. Betty is as tough as the best of them, but she's deeply shaken when her first investigation goes sideways. Battling a group of unruly subordinates, a persistent stalker, a formidable criminal organization, and an unsupportive girlfriend, the unbreakable Detective Betty Rhyzyk may be reaching her limit. “Violent, sexy, and completely absorbing,” our critic writes in a starred review. “Kent's detective is Sam Spade reincarnated—as a brilliant, modern woman.” View video >