Nature & Travel Book Reviews (page 200)

NEW WORLDS, NEW GEOGRAPHIES by John Rennie Short
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: April 15, 1998

"Readers may find it more satisfying to spend time writing their own story than reading this one."
A puzzle, but an interesting one. Read full book review >
THE RED HOURGLASS by Gordon Grice
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: April 1, 1998

"For readers who like their pets on the hazardous side—and those readers are in for a treat."
A nicely written, appropriately gruesome look at black widows, brown recluses, tarantulas, and other creepy-crawlies. Read full book review >

ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: April 1, 1998

"Interspersed with these scholarly chapters are —interludes— about Browning's own fishing experiences."
paper 0-8214-1219-1 Fishing, particularly fly fishing, writes Browning, "seems to hold a disproportionate place" in North American letters In this thoughtful, penetrating, but dissertation-like look at the literature of fly-fishing, the author notes that fishermen who write can be likened to our ancient ancestors, "who blazoned portrayals of the hunt on the walls of . . . caves." Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: April 1, 1998

"As her husband said to the pricey arborist, 'We'll get back to you on that.'"
The education of a gardener, ultimately about as interesting as watching grass grow, from freelancer DesCamp. Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: April 1, 1998

"It all makes for an alarming tale enthusiastically, and convincingly, told. (85 line drawings, 5 tables, and 8 photos, not seen)"
A scientific survey whose rhetorical title is answered in the affirmative'sort of. Read full book review >

NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: April 1, 1998

A level and elegant introduction to (and history of) natural gardening from Marinelli. Read full book review >
RED-TAILS IN LOVE by Marie Winn
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: March 30, 1998

"Wildlife Almanac'' in the appendix."
This story is for the birds—but even non-avians will applaud this winning narrative of romantic raptors and other feathered habituÇs of Manhattan's Central Park. Read full book review >
ECOVIEWS by Whit Gibbons
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: March 25, 1998

"These are enthralling regional tidbits, the kind of stuff that makes readers yearn for more, for the big picture. (illustrations, not seen)"
Musings on the environment, particularly that of the southeastern US, delivered with an easy fireside manner, from the Gibbonses (he's author of Their Blood Runs Cold, not reviewed; she's a freelance editor). Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: March 9, 1998

"Just so."
This companion volume to the Capuzzos' Cat Caught My Heart (p. 31) follows the same format: songs in praise of pet ownership, culled from material sent to Michael Capuzzo's syndicated ``Wild Things'' column, only this time the adored object is Rover. Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: March 9, 1998

"In the end, all these letters attest to one simple point: Cats play cat-lovers like stringed instruments."
For anyone who has ever been owned by a cat, these selected letters from readers of Michael Capuzzo's (with coauthor Teresa Banik Capuzzo, a Pulitzer Prizewinning journalist) syndicated column, ``Wild Things,'' will surely sound many familiar notes. Read full book review >
DEAR MR. JEFFERSON by Laura Simon
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 4, 1998

"Literate evocations of a place and a passion that, like the best of the genre, are as much about living a richly fulfilling life as cultivating a garden. (line drawings)"
Like her garden, Simon's imaginary correspondence with the nation's most illustrious gardener is a beguiling mix of history, whimsy, and practicality. Read full book review >
AN HONEST ANGLER by Patricia Miller Sherwood
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: March 1, 1998

"Hackle would be better served with a framework that does more than simply reprint columns and excerpts with little or no logical order or context."
These columns, articles, and letters from the late fly-fishing writer Sparse Grey Hackle (a.k.a. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jeff Chang
September 20, 2016

In the provocative essays in journalist Jeff Chang’s new book We Gon’ Be Alright, Chang takes an incisive and wide-ranging look at the recent tragedies and widespread protests that have shaken the country. Through deep reporting with key activists and thinkers, personal writing, and cultural criticism, We Gon’ Be Alright links #BlackLivesMatter to #OscarsSoWhite, Ferguson to Washington D.C., the Great Migration to resurgent nativism. Chang explores the rise and fall of the idea of “diversity,” the roots of student protest, changing ideas about Asian Americanness, and the impact of a century of racial separation in housing. “He implores readers to listen, act, and become involved with today’s activists, who offer ‘new ways to see our past and our present,’ ” our reviewer writes in a starred review. “A compelling and intellectually thought-provoking exploration of the quagmire of race relations.” View video >