Nature & Travel Book Reviews (page 200)

NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"Gould fans will be charmed at the cogency and cleverness of his arguments—but expect a wall of opposition from pious and diehard progressivists. (50 illustrations, not seen) (Author tour)"
Now hear this: Evolution is not progressive. Read full book review >
THE BURIAL BROTHERS by Simon Mayle
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"A grade B movie on wheels, indelicate and noir. (Author tour- -with hearse)"
A darkly entertaining, raunchy road trip—New York City to Brazil—by hearse, from newcomer Mayle. Read full book review >

HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"Although Davis might have been better advised to scale down, this is an exceptional tale of 20th-century scientific exploration and a rousing travelogue to places both real and illusory. (8 pages b&w photos, not seen)"
A fascinating narrative of the exploits of Harvard ethnobotanist Richard Evans Schultes, interwoven with the much more benign adventure of his student, author and ethnobotanist Davis (The Serpent and the Rainbow, 1986). Read full book review >
IN SEARCH OF NATURE by Edward O. Wilson
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"For the rest, really only a reprise."
A dozen essays on familiar Wilson themes: social species, biodiversity, sociobiology, along with personal reflections and thoughts for the future. Read full book review >
DINOSAURS OF THE FLAMING CLIFFS by Michael Novacek
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"A fine treatment for the general reader and a treasure trove for dinosaur buffs. (30 b&w illustrations, not seen)"
Field paleontology in Mongolia's Gobi Desert is at once the most difficult and the most rewarding of scientific endeavors; here's a firsthand account by the leader of a major expedition. Read full book review >

ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"If Quarrington is half as entertaining around a campfire as he is in this book, then he represents the Platonic ideal of the fishing buddy."
Novelist Quarrington (Whale Music, 1989) coaxes a wealth of bright humor from a couple of unlikely suspects: a fishless fishing trip and some really bad weather. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Aug. 30, 1996

"Descola's fine ethnographic writing, along with his critical remarks on the anthropological enterprise, make this book of a piece with LÇvi-Strauss's landmark Tristes Tropiques. (b&w photos, not seen)"
An uncommonly well written ethnology of a part of the world much imagined and little visited. Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Aug. 26, 1996

"A trifle bloodthirsty, but lively and genuine. (line art)"
A medley of well-crafted essays and short stories highlights one man's lifelong love affair with bird hunting. Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Aug. 26, 1996

"We breathe the exhalations of the trees, and as Lembke testifies, they fuel a hundred more poetic concerns. (line drawings, not seen)"
Arboreal musings—learned, canny, homespun, graceful—from one of our better natural history writers. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 1, 1996

"Even posthumously Chatwin remains, in a word, awesome."
The travel writer and memoirist Andrew Harvey said of the late Chatwin (What Am I Doing Here?, 1989, etc.) that ``nearly every writer of my generation has wanted, above all, to have written his books.'' This collection of miscellaneous pieces published for the first time in book form will only fuel that envy. Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Aug. 1, 1996

"An important contribution to the growing literature of environmental degradation and racism, and a fine case study in local politics. (b&w photos, not seen)"
A blow-by-blow account of a rural southern community's fight to keep toxic waste out of its backyard. Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Aug. 1, 1996

"While there is plenty here to give a susceptible late-night reader a good case of the chills, there is little for the intellect to grapple with."
Another here-come-the-aliens book that one might be willing to dismiss as mindless entertainment if it weren't so determined to pretend it's serious. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >