Nature & Travel Book Reviews (page 204)

NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: June 1, 1997

"It is a love song, a celebration, and a well-told tale. (photos and illustrations, not seen)"
A sweeping, lapidary history of our relationship with dogs from Derr (The Frontiersman, 1993, etc.). Read full book review >
SNAKES by Harry W. Greene
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: June 1, 1997

"Emerging from this work is a creature less to be reviled than to be admired, demonstrating extraordinary evolutionary adaptability, fabulous variety, and spectacular coloration."
A comprehensive and deeply satisfying exploration of that much-maligned creature, the snake, from herpetologist Greene (Univ. of Calif., Berkeley). Read full book review >

TO TIMBUKTU by Mark Jenkins
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: June 1, 1997

"While the narrative's occasional sluggishness and sometimes boastful prose can be heavy wading, the subject matter ought to hold the interest of like-minded adventurers. (20 color photos, not seen)"
Some intrepid young men become the first outsiders to boat down the fearsome upper reaches of the Niger River. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: June 1, 1997

"The benefits began winning out, Schwartz demonstrates, a long time ago. (84 illustrations, not seen)"
A clunkily written but fairly fascinating history of dogs in the pre-Columbian Americas, from Schwartz, a research assistant in anthropology at Yale. Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: June 1, 1997

"And his rock throwing at various friends of the tiger will get him nothing but a sour reputation—though his heart is in the right place."
How has the tiger come by its sorry endangered status, and what are its odds for survival? Read full book review >

NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: June 1, 1997

"While there is no simple explanation forthcoming, Jerome's search has produced a robust, idiosyncratic, moving celebration of the natural world, of the rivers and lakes that form and sustain it, and of its ability to nourish and restore us."
An elegiac, deeply personal, discursive celebration of water and of those who are drawn to it. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 1, 1997

"It's too easy to get corny and cute on this subject, and Rowan succumbs—only people with terminal canineophilia will want to read this all the way through."
George Washington had one. Read full book review >
BIOMIMICRY by Janine M. Benyus
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: June 1, 1997

"Much of interest here, but spare us the cheerleading."
``Doing it nature's way'' is the theme of this wide-eyed-with-wonder exposition of what's going on in a variety of fields—from farming to computer science—as scientists try to emulate natural processes. Read full book review >
JOE AND ME by James Prosek
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: June 1, 1997

"Prosek, now a senior at Yale, may well be on his way to becoming a fine writer of the outdoors. (color paintings by the author, not seen)"
Sweet, innocent, if not particularly artful, recollections of fishing with a local master. Read full book review >
SEA CHANGE by Peter Nichols
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: June 1, 1997

"Though Toad springs a major leak and must be abandoned before reaching its destination, one comes away with the feeling that Nichols has indeed acquitted himself well. (Book-of-the-Month Club alternate selection; author tour)"
A little wooden sailboat, a raft of memories, and the wide blue Atlantic carry sailor Nichols from England to Maine, almost, in this earnest, reflective chronicle. Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: May 19, 1997

"Reading this gripping book is likely to make the would-be sailor feel both awed and a little frightened by nature's remorseless power."
The experience of being caught at sea in the maw of a "perfect'' storm (that is, one formed of an almost unique combination of factors), a monstrous tempest that couldn't get any worse, is spellbindingly captured by Junger, a journalist. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: May 15, 1997

"Even so, his book makes for an armchair traveler's delight. (Author tour)"
A richly observant memoir of a coast-to-coast journey along the US-Canada border, which the author undertook ``a little unsure of how to proceed but eager to see what I could.'' The people along that line, writes novelist Mosher (Northern Borders, 1994, etc.), are a breed apart: self-reliant, tenacious, suspicious of the governments in Washington and Ottawa alike, to the point of harboring secessionist sympathies. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nancy Isenberg
author of WHITE TRASH
July 19, 2016

Poor Americans have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlement. They were alternately known as “waste people,” “offals,” “rubbish,” “lazy lubbers,” and “crackers.” By the 1850s, the downtrodden included so-called “clay eaters” and “sandhillers,” known for prematurely aged children distinguished by their yellowish skin, ragged clothing, and listless minds. Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over 400 years, in White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America, Nancy Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society––where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. “A riveting thesis supported by staggering research,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >