Nature & Travel Book Reviews (page 204)

NON-FICTION
Released: April 19, 1999

"Like its subject, Rushby's book can loosen one's mooring to the everyday world, conveying the reader to darkened rooms high above ancient, exotic cities."
A superior travel narrative of the qat trail, its history and strange quirks, and very strange characters, from newcomer Rushby. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 1999

"It is a well-worn path through a very public landscape that Foster travels, and he fails to jump the ruts."
Any way you slice Harvard University ecologist Foster's evolutionary portrait of the New England landscape—psychogeography, an archaeology of place, glimmerings of the swiftness of nature's transformations—his choice of subject thwarts him: whatever he has to say, it has been better said before Foster's point is clear and sensible: "Nature can only be understood through an awareness of its history," and if we are to appreciate, conserve, and manage ecosystems, we must know that history. Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 1999

"At its worst, it's like being stuck on a long camping trip with Shirley MacLaine."
This tale of teenagers struggling to remake their lives in the wilds of southern Utah manages to be both deeply lyrical and seriously sappy. Read full book review >
COUGAR! by Harold P. Danz
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 1999

"This is an admirable synthesis and summary of cougar knowledge. (photos, not seen)"
paper 0-8040-1015-3 Note your place in the food chain, suggests former Park Service officer Danz. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 1999

SHADOW CATEncountering the American Mountain LionEwing, Susan & Elizabeth Grossman—Eds. Read full book review >

MY SECRET FISHING LIFE by Nick Lyons
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 1999

"The thought of it is outrageous—the world needs more, not less, of so generous a soul."
Broadsides from the fishing stream, with the appealing qualities of both an informal chat and a polished etude, from Lyons (A Flyfisher's World, 1996, etc.). Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 1999

"Though they try hard for journalistic objectivity, it's clear where the authors' sympathies lie as they chart different courses that can reduce the human contribution to extinction."
Intelligently affecting stories of animals reduced to rarity, what leads to their predicament, and the people and ideas working to ward off extinction. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 1999

"In the meantime readers can relish eyewitness accounts of academic fur flying and the nonclaustrophobic can experience the vicarious thrills of cavers for whom getting there is a lot of the fun."
In an account that is half cave adventure, half science venture, intrepid journalist Taylor tells what it's like to collect bacteria samples in the deep and dark and what happens later when experts battle over what the depths reveal. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 1999

"He wants his relations with cetaceans to feel right, and these pages recounting his odd experiences are his notes toward that understanding."
Broad-minded excursions through the inscrutable land of interspecies communication—in this case, the human-cetacean nexus—and the mind-altering perceptions that potentially ensue, by musician and latitudinarian Nollman (Why We Garden: Cultivating a Sense of Place, 1994; Dolphin Dreamtime, not reviewed). Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 1999

"A useful addition to the growing landscape-in-history literature."
A well-conceived if sometimes plodding essay in the role of the landscape in American history. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 1999

"Intelligent and broadly inquisitive, Weidensaul provides the kind of revelatory anecdote that allows lay birders (and any other reader) to ratchet their appreciation of the avian world up a significant notch. (maps)"
A tidy and, for all its depth, nimble summation of current thinking on bird migration and attendant environmental themes from Weidensaul (Mountains of the Heart: A Natural History of the Appalachians, not reviewed). Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: March 29, 1999

"Admittedly, there is material here that falls a few sparks short of explosive—the scant depth of the rufous piha's nest, for example—but Skutch always invests his findings with the high purpose of bell-clear scholarship, even when of the footnote variety. (27 line drawings)"
Skutch (A Naturalist Amid Tropical Splendor, 1987, etc.) has had the chance, the curiosity, and the resolve—for over 70 years—to observe the habits of little-known tropical birds, and the gleanings here add random, intelligent insights to our stock of avian wonder. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >