Nature & Travel Book Reviews (page 205)

NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 1999

"In the meantime readers can relish eyewitness accounts of academic fur flying and the nonclaustrophobic can experience the vicarious thrills of cavers for whom getting there is a lot of the fun."
In an account that is half cave adventure, half science venture, intrepid journalist Taylor tells what it's like to collect bacteria samples in the deep and dark and what happens later when experts battle over what the depths reveal. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 1999

"He wants his relations with cetaceans to feel right, and these pages recounting his odd experiences are his notes toward that understanding."
Broad-minded excursions through the inscrutable land of interspecies communication—in this case, the human-cetacean nexus—and the mind-altering perceptions that potentially ensue, by musician and latitudinarian Nollman (Why We Garden: Cultivating a Sense of Place, 1994; Dolphin Dreamtime, not reviewed). Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 1999

"A useful addition to the growing landscape-in-history literature."
A well-conceived if sometimes plodding essay in the role of the landscape in American history. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 1999

"Intelligent and broadly inquisitive, Weidensaul provides the kind of revelatory anecdote that allows lay birders (and any other reader) to ratchet their appreciation of the avian world up a significant notch. (maps)"
A tidy and, for all its depth, nimble summation of current thinking on bird migration and attendant environmental themes from Weidensaul (Mountains of the Heart: A Natural History of the Appalachians, not reviewed). Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: March 29, 1999

"Admittedly, there is material here that falls a few sparks short of explosive—the scant depth of the rufous piha's nest, for example—but Skutch always invests his findings with the high purpose of bell-clear scholarship, even when of the footnote variety. (27 line drawings)"
Skutch (A Naturalist Amid Tropical Splendor, 1987, etc.) has had the chance, the curiosity, and the resolve—for over 70 years—to observe the habits of little-known tropical birds, and the gleanings here add random, intelligent insights to our stock of avian wonder. Read full book review >

GARDENS OF REMEMBRANCE by Thomas McCarthy
NON-FICTION
Released: March 26, 1999

"Lacking organization, focus, and depth, this book is a bland mixture of incompatible ingredients tossed haphazardly into a pot."
A forgettable hodgepodge of childhood memoir, travel diary, and essays on poetry. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: March 8, 1999

"He brings a bright, childlike eagerness to these days on the stream or in the field and forest, burnishing their memory with thoughtfulness and elegance. (illustrations, not seen)"
Few sports can boast as many old-fangled pleasures as camping and its related activities, and Dennis (The River Home: An Angler's Explorations, 1998, etc.) beckoningly delineates many of them in these light, silky essays. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: March 3, 1999

"And lest he forget their essential wildness, a little bite—a modest puncture 'a half-inch square and three-quarters-inch deep''serves to remind him. (42 b&w photos) (Book-of-the-Month/Quality Paperback Book Club selection)"
You know you're a bear when heaven is a rotten log full of grubs and ants. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 1999

"If Issoufou offered Chilson 'a buffet spread of a nation's economy and politics,' Chilson in turns offers it to us, seen through the dark and scary glass of the road."
The raw cultural, political, and economic vitality of West Africa is sought by newcomer Chilson upon Niger's lawless, hair-raising, fickle, murderous—in a word, insane—roads. Read full book review >
THE TULIP by Anna Pavord
NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 1999

"This floral portrait is alive with wonder; even the concluding catalogue raisonnÇ of species is a work of passion."
A disarming, captivating history of the tulip—a byzantine story rich in subtexts, from Pavord, gardening correspondent for the Independent in England (The Flowering Year, not reviewed, etc.). Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 1999

"The biological essentialism and mechanistic view of cultural activities propounded by Stanford here is not likely to sway many of the critics who wished to discredit the Man the Hunter model in the first place, but may find favor with those inclined toward sociobiology."
An unabashed celebration of the carnivorous tendencies of early humankind. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 1999

"In a literature so abounding in snobs and reverse snobs, Schullery comes like a blast of fresh air, an iconoclast with an inclusive spirit that Whitman would have admired."
Schullery (Searching for Yellowstone: Ecology and Wonder in the Last Wilderness, 1997, etc.), an inveterate ferreter of fly- fishing's deep past, serves up more arcana and opinions for the sport's devout. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >