Nature & Travel Book Reviews (page 205)

NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 1999

"Only the most cynical wouldn't wish Chiles the best and take pleasure in his capers: sail on, sailor, sail on. (maps, not seen)"
Bad days sailing, told with aristocratic though strangely appealing understatement, by Chiles (The Ocean Waits, 1984). Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 1999

"If Dickinson's spirit was as sour on the mountain as it is in this book, his partners would be forgiven for wondering which was the greater menace: the cruelty of the high-altitude world or Dickinson's presence in it. (16 pages color photos, not seen) (Author tour)"
Everest again, May 1996 again, this time on the Tibetan side, in a tedious, self-obsessed account from filmmaker Dickinson. Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 1999

"A fine contribution to the environmental literature."
A detailed but accessible introduction to forest ecology, with an Oregon treescape as case study. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 1999

"With flair, Price makes her point: For better or worse, from Lascaux to Marty Stouffer, our notions of 'nature' are often a self-serving, corrupting social construct that can be used to navigate an avoidance of societal and economic problems rather than highlighting them."
Piquant explorations of attitudes toward the "natural" world as mediated by the likes of Ralph and Martha and Hollywood, from essayist Price. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 1999

"Readers, like vacationers, want some entertainment, too."
An interesting if somewhat academic social history of the American vacation that examines the tension between the American work ethic and the concept of leisure. Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 1999

"If he educates, it's as a broadly inquisitive and keen naturalist; that he amuses is not a point for debate. (63 b&w photos, 8 illustrations, not seen)"
Bondeson (A Cabinet of Medical Curiosities, 1997) is back with another mind-blowing collection of scientific anomalies and mysteries. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: April 26, 1999

"Just as Hubbell intended, readers leave these essays with nothing short of charity and friendship toward these little beasts, and a profound appreciation for Hubbell's artful introductions. (Author tour)"
Hubbell (Far Flung Hubbell: Essays from the American Road, 1995, etc.), fresh to her Maine coast home after 25 years in the Ozarks, goes exploring among the spineless and the no-necks. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: April 22, 1999

"Ayres's apocalyptic tone is at odds with his earlier cool scientific rationality, and it may cause some readers to dismiss his well-made glimpse into a difficult future as simply more doomsday-speak."
Carefully researched science journalism and alarmist polemic mingle in an end-of-the-world-as-we-know-it treatise. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: April 19, 1999

"Like its subject, Rushby's book can loosen one's mooring to the everyday world, conveying the reader to darkened rooms high above ancient, exotic cities."
A superior travel narrative of the qat trail, its history and strange quirks, and very strange characters, from newcomer Rushby. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 1999

"It is a well-worn path through a very public landscape that Foster travels, and he fails to jump the ruts."
Any way you slice Harvard University ecologist Foster's evolutionary portrait of the New England landscape—psychogeography, an archaeology of place, glimmerings of the swiftness of nature's transformations—his choice of subject thwarts him: whatever he has to say, it has been better said before Foster's point is clear and sensible: "Nature can only be understood through an awareness of its history," and if we are to appreciate, conserve, and manage ecosystems, we must know that history. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 1999

"At its worst, it's like being stuck on a long camping trip with Shirley MacLaine."
This tale of teenagers struggling to remake their lives in the wilds of southern Utah manages to be both deeply lyrical and seriously sappy. Read full book review >
COUGAR! by Harold P. Danz
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 1999

"This is an admirable synthesis and summary of cougar knowledge. (photos, not seen)"
paper 0-8040-1015-3 Note your place in the food chain, suggests former Park Service officer Danz. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >