Nature & Travel Book Reviews (page 205)

NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Feb. 1, 1997

"Good stuff entertainingly told, and a gold mine for dog fanciers. (35 photos, 35 illustrations)"
To this season of the dog book, add this sprightly celebration of canine anecdotes. Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Feb. 1, 1997

"This is a consistently informative and surprisingly entertaining history, delivering far more than its modest title promises. (36 b&w photos, not seen)"
From the picturesque to the package tour, Withey (Voyages of Discovery: Captain Cook and the Exploration of the Pacific, 1987) chronicles the birth and growth of modern world tourism. Read full book review >

NORTH ENOUGH by Jan Zita Grover
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Feb. 1, 1997

A meditation on AIDS and the destruction of the environment. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 1, 1997

"The details, and the transporting power of the quotidian, are what fascinate here. (illustrations, not seen)"
Selections from a year-long diary kept by a newlywed while sailing aboard her husband's merchant bark, evocatively framed with minutely researched background material by Petroski (Gravity and Other Stories, not reviewed). Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Jan. 15, 1997

"Earth could use more nimble old souls like Schneider, with his commonsensical voice."
The beauty of environmental complexity is lucidly displayed in this Cook's Tour of grand earthly processes. Read full book review >

THE SECRET SCHOOL by Whitley Strieber
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Jan. 15, 1997

"Having fallen victim, perhaps, to millennial madness, Strieber believes himself on a mission to save the world."
Strieber's ongoing narrative of his encounters with some form of higher intelligence—whether through actual visitations by aliens or a kind of altered consciousness—here becomes an increasingly incredible fable of time travel, prophecy, and visions of God. Read full book review >
THE GREAT AMERICAN WOLF by Bruce Hampton
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Jan. 1, 1997

"For readers with a casual interest in wolves, however, Hampton's book will be of interest. (16 pages b&w photos)"
A survey of the wolf's peculiar role in North American history—first as an enemy of civilization, now as an object of pity. Read full book review >
THE SEASON by Tom Kelly
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Dec. 16, 1996

"A genuine love song to outdoorsmanship as sharp-eyed, bawdy, and unbridled as a gobbler in full strut."
An Alabama woodsman looks back at a lifetime of turkey hunting, refracted through the lens of his most recent season, and he likes what he sees. Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Dec. 1, 1996

"A feast for those who hunger after terra incognita. (35 maps and illustrations)"
Entertaining voyages into the geography of the imagination, from a sailor and journalist (Charting the Sea of Darkness, not reviewed). Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Dec. 1, 1996

"A fascinating slice of cultural history, and a sterling tribute to dogs through the centuries. (color and b&w illustrations, not seen) (Book-of-the-Month Club and Quality Paperback Book Club selection)"
Early on in this sprightly study, one thing becomes clear: Canines have been good for us, but we haven't always repaid the kindness. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Dec. 1, 1996

"But if you want to look at this mass phenomenon seriously, here is the place to start."
Courtly prose and amiable digressions distinguish this study of what some may not consider a serious topic: tourism. Read full book review >
TRACES OF AN OMNIVORE by Paul Shepard
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Nov. 26, 1996

"Radical, indelicate, opinionated, and dauntingly learned even at their most outlandish, Shepard's ideas on humanity's true place in the environment are well worth mulling over."
If you want to cure the many ills afflicting our species, take your cues from our ancestors in the Pleistocene. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fernanda Santos
author of THE FIRE LINE
May 17, 2016

When a bolt of lightning ignited a hilltop in the sleepy town of Yarnell, Arizona, in June 2013, setting off a blaze that would grow into one of the deadliest fires in American history, the 20 men who made up the Granite Mountain Hotshots sprang into action. New York Times writer Fernanda Santos’ debut book The Fire Line is the story of the fire and the Hotshots’ attempts to extinguish it. An elite crew trained to combat the most challenging wildfires, the Hotshots were a ragtag family, crisscrossing the American West and wherever else the fires took them. There's Eric Marsh, their devoted and demanding superintendent who turned his own personal demons into lessons he used to mold, train and guide his crew; Jesse Steed, their captain, a former Marine, a beast on the fire line and a family man who wasn’t afraid to say “I love you” to the firemen he led; Andrew Ashcraft, a team leader still in his 20s who struggled to balance his love for his beautiful wife and four children and his passion for fighting wildfires. We see this band of brothers at work, at play and at home, until a fire that burned in their own backyards leads to a national tragedy. View video >