Nature & Travel Book Reviews (page 205)

NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: April 1, 1998

"It all makes for an alarming tale enthusiastically, and convincingly, told. (85 line drawings, 5 tables, and 8 photos, not seen)"
A scientific survey whose rhetorical title is answered in the affirmative'sort of. Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: April 1, 1998

A level and elegant introduction to (and history of) natural gardening from Marinelli. Read full book review >

RED-TAILS IN LOVE by Marie Winn
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: March 30, 1998

"Wildlife Almanac'' in the appendix."
This story is for the birds—but even non-avians will applaud this winning narrative of romantic raptors and other feathered habituÇs of Manhattan's Central Park. Read full book review >
ECOVIEWS by Whit Gibbons
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: March 25, 1998

"These are enthralling regional tidbits, the kind of stuff that makes readers yearn for more, for the big picture. (illustrations, not seen)"
Musings on the environment, particularly that of the southeastern US, delivered with an easy fireside manner, from the Gibbonses (he's author of Their Blood Runs Cold, not reviewed; she's a freelance editor). Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: March 9, 1998

"Just so."
This companion volume to the Capuzzos' Cat Caught My Heart (p. 31) follows the same format: songs in praise of pet ownership, culled from material sent to Michael Capuzzo's syndicated ``Wild Things'' column, only this time the adored object is Rover. Read full book review >

NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: March 9, 1998

"In the end, all these letters attest to one simple point: Cats play cat-lovers like stringed instruments."
For anyone who has ever been owned by a cat, these selected letters from readers of Michael Capuzzo's (with coauthor Teresa Banik Capuzzo, a Pulitzer Prizewinning journalist) syndicated column, ``Wild Things,'' will surely sound many familiar notes. Read full book review >
DEAR MR. JEFFERSON by Laura Simon
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 4, 1998

"Literate evocations of a place and a passion that, like the best of the genre, are as much about living a richly fulfilling life as cultivating a garden. (line drawings)"
Like her garden, Simon's imaginary correspondence with the nation's most illustrious gardener is a beguiling mix of history, whimsy, and practicality. Read full book review >
AN HONEST ANGLER by Patricia Miller Sherwood
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: March 1, 1998

"Hackle would be better served with a framework that does more than simply reprint columns and excerpts with little or no logical order or context."
These columns, articles, and letters from the late fly-fishing writer Sparse Grey Hackle (a.k.a. Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Feb. 1, 1998

"No bones about it, Phillips is a partisan, but she makes an elegant and persuasive case for going native."
Phillips (Tracking the Vanishing Frogs, 1994) provides a lucid explanation of natural landscaping as she follows in the footsteps of one of its practitioners. Read full book review >
WICKERBY by Charles Siebert
HISTORY
Released: Feb. 1, 1998

"A welcome departure from reverent naturalism, Wickerby survives its sillier moments on the strength of Siebert's fine writing and keen eye for beauty in the margins."
An anti-Thoreauvian sojourn in the Canadian wilds turns eco- lyricism on its head by spurring an iconoclastic tribute to the big bad city's natural charms. Read full book review >
SURVIVING THE TOUGHEST RACE ON EARTH by Martin Dugard
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 1, 1998

"Not everyone will feel the Raid's calling. (16 illustrations, not seen)"
In the true spirit of a participant/observer's way to knowledge, sports journalist Dugard tackles the vigorously insane sport of adventure racing. Read full book review >
WILD THOUGHTS FROM WILD PLACES by David Quammen
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Feb. 1, 1998

"The link seems to be whatever engages the soul of the wanderer ready to backpack and laptop his adventures in technicolor prose. (Have synecdoche, will travel.)"
This culling of columns and magazine pieces penned for Outside, Rolling Stone, and Powder over 15 years reveals no damping of his passion for nature, no failure of nerve in testing his skills in the wild, and no stinting in his admiration for the pros—scientists, athletes, and others—he has encountered. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Clinton Kelly
January 9, 2017

Bestselling author and television host Clinton Kelly’s memoir I Hate Everyone Except You is a candid, deliciously snarky collection of essays about his journey from awkward kid to slightly-less-awkward adult. Clinton Kelly is probably best known for teaching women how to make their butts look smaller. But in I Hate Everyone, Except You, he reveals some heretofore-unknown secrets about himself, like that he’s a finicky connoisseur of 1980s pornography, a disillusioned critic of New Jersey’s premier water parks, and perhaps the world’s least enthused high-school commencement speaker. Whether he’s throwing his baby sister in the air to jumpstart her cheerleading career or heroically rescuing his best friend from death by mud bath, Clinton leaps life’s social hurdles with aplomb. With his signature wit, he shares his unique ability to navigate the stickiest of situations, like deciding whether it’s acceptable to eat chicken wings with a fork on live television (spoiler: it’s not). “A thoroughly light and entertaining memoir,” our critic writes. View video >