Nature & Travel Book Reviews (page 206)

HEART AND BLOOD by Richard Nelson
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Oct. 3, 1997

"A compelling, multifaceted, and broadly curious portrait of the deer among us."
Close encounters with Cervidae, from soup to nuts, biological to behavioral to metaphysical, by Nelson (The Island Within, 1989). ``I'm not sure when I became obsessed with deer,'' Nelson admits, but obsessed he is. Read full book review >
JAMES HERRIOT'S ANIMAL STORIES by James Herriot
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"Fans won't need the volume, though newcomers may find it a useful introduction. (Literary Guild alternate selection)"
The Herriot industry never sleeps. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"Richard Henry Dana is a great hero of hers)—it was actually two months aft of the mast in a sixth-floor stateroom—but one leaves her book sensing she paints a genuine portrait. (20 b&w photos, map, not seen)"
This recounting of a Pacific run aboard a merchant marine ship from boating journalist Allen may be prosaic, but it is also lulling, as if it had caught the rhythm of wide ocean swells. Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"Barcott knows his mountain, and his story is enthralling, respectful, bitingly witty, and wise."
A marvelous biography of Mt. Read full book review >
SNOWBOUND by Ladd Hamilton
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"No one emerges unscathed here, except Hamilton, whose yarn- spinning reconstruction is a pleasure. (maps, illustrations, photos)"
A detailed, well-paced re-creation of the Carlin hunting party fiasco of 1893 by Hamilton (This Bloody Deed, not reviewed). Read full book review >

NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"This hit-and-miss social commentary, combined with a penchant for inflated academic language (allayed only slightly by period cartoons), sabotages Ritvo's goal of illuminating the cultural ramifications of Enlightenment zoology. (illustrations)"
This wide-ranging study of the ``heroic age of scientific classification'' attempts—with only partial success—to place the taxonomic advances and prejudices of 18th- and 19th-century England in a broader cultural context. Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"Sellars does not make the reader's task an easy or pleasant one—a shame, because he has much to say to those interested in the way national resources are managed."
A dry but useful academic study of misguided federal resource management and ecological experimentation. ``Nature preservation—especially that requiring a thorough scientific understanding of the resources intended for preservation—is an aspect of park operations in which the [National Park] Service has advanced in a reluctant, vacillating way,'' writes Sellars, a historian with the Park Service. Read full book review >
A SEARCH FOR THE PERFECT DOG by Gary Shiebler
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"Raising a puppy is remarkably similar to raising a baby''- -readers may begin to question just what they are doing reading this book. (4 b&w photos, not seen)"
Vapid dog stories, prompted by Shiebler's own pets and a stint as ``humane educator'' at the Helen Woodward Animal Center in southern California. Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"In sharing them, he gives readers back some of their own. (24 b&w photos, 2 maps, not seen)"
Alaska's Mount St. Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"Jane Goodall has written the book's introduction. (16 pages b&w photos not seen) (First printing of 50,000; first serial to Reader's Digest; film rights to Fox 2000; Book-of-the-Month Club featured selection; author tour)"
Though he was studying theories of communication, Fouts (Psychology/Central Washington Univ.) learned a whole lot more than that from the chimps in his American Sign Language program, and he tells their story here with great insight and affection. Read full book review >
THE TREES IN MY FOREST by Bernd Heinrich
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"Heinrich tells us more about trees than we'd ever dream of wondering, yet manages to transform the esoterica into a fascinating tribute to nature's superior design."
This lyrical testament to the stunning complexity of the natural world also documents one man's bid to make a difference on his own little patch of land. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"Dull heartland postcards about the fallow months."
The journal of one winter by Klaus, a gardener, writer, and semi-retired teacher stranded happily in Iowa City. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kendare Blake
November 16, 2016

Bestseller Kendare Blake’s latest novel, Three Dark Crowns, a dark and inventive fantasy about three sisters who must fight to the death to become queen. In every generation on the island of Fennbirn, a set of triplets is born: three queens, all equal heirs to the crown and each possessor of a coveted magic. Mirabella is a fierce elemental, able to spark hungry flames or vicious storms at the snap of her fingers. Katharine is a poisoner, one who can ingest the deadliest poisons without so much as a stomachache. Arsinoe, a naturalist, is said to have the ability to bloom the reddest rose and control the fiercest of lions. But becoming the Queen Crowned isn’t solely a matter of royal birth. Each sister has to fight for it. The last queen standing gets the crown. “Gorgeous and bloody, tender and violent, elegant, precise, and passionate; above all, completely addicting,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >