Nature & Travel Book Reviews (page 206)

THE QUEST FOR LONGITUDE by William J.H. Andrewes
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Nov. 14, 1996

"Attractively designed, this large volume is lavishly illustrated in both color and black-and-white."
Any armchair navigator or scientist who was captivated by Dava Sobel's bestselling but brief 1995 book, Longitude, can wallow at length in the subject with this comprehensive volume based on a 1993 symposium (which was also the origin of Sobel's book). Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Nov. 1, 1996

"Recommended reading for budding naturalists. (16 line drawings, not seen)"
A warm, often funny, sometimes discomfiting look into the lives of creepy-crawly creatures. Read full book review >

DESERT PLACES by Robyn Davidson
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 1996

"Davidson's conventional attempts to generalize about an abstraction called India are much less interesting than her well-told encounters with fascinating, lovable, resourceful people. (16 pages color photos, not seen) (Author tour)"
An Australian woman spends several harrowing months with desert nomads in the Indian desert, witnessing one of that land's last great pastoral migrations. Read full book review >
THE BOOK OF YAAK by Rick Bass
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Nov. 1, 1996

"Even so, this is a valuable document in the continuing battle over wilderness preservation."
An urgent plea by a longtime resident to preserve one of the lower 48's remaining wilderness areas. Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Nov. 1, 1996

"Spurning his advice would only be folly. (16 pages photos, not seen)"
In this raw-edged sequel to his Last of the Free (1995), Patterson updates readers on the fate of his lion cohorts in the southern African bushlands. Read full book review >

THE ABSTRACT WILD by Jack Turner
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Oct. 30, 1996

"This sometimes blistering, provocative, well-written book is an ecoradical's dream come true—and every reader concerned with wilderness issues should take it into account."
Loosely connected but powerfully written essays on our relationship to wilderness. Read full book review >
THE GIFT OF TROUT by Ted Leeson
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Oct. 28, 1996

"Only 50 percent of these entries deserve to be called great writing; the remainder qualify as good ol' boys scratching each others' good ol' backs. (b&w illustrations)"
The keeper of this ``treasury'' of troutiana should have kept a sharper eye out for counterfeits. Read full book review >
BRINGING THE MOUNTAIN HOME by SueEllen Campbell
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Oct. 22, 1996

"Campbell conveys that magic in words that have very much those qualities."
Elegantly fashioned, intimate thoughts on what the wilderness means to her, from Campbell (English/Colorado State Univ.). ``The desire for wilderness is an elemental force, like gravity, like magnetism,'' she says. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 15, 1996

"Two perfectly lovely stories, padded a bit to fill up a slim, but nonetheless sweet, volume. (photos, not seen)"
A charming tale of two British feline war heroes, and of the many people whose lives they touched. Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Oct. 10, 1996

"Any gardener, true-blue or armchair variety, will want to settle down and read Klaus."
A serenely informal gardener's companion. Read full book review >
SEVEN CATS AND THE ART OF LIVING by Jo Coudert
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Oct. 10, 1996

"If at times Coudert's ministerings have a quaintly vapid air about them, at the very least they feel genuine: little homilies, tendered with best wishes. (24 b&w drawings by the author)"
As she profiles the cats in her life, Coudert (Go Well: The Story of a House, 1974, etc.) gleans a raft of life lessons. Read full book review >
WATER by Alice Outwater
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Oct. 9, 1996

"The focus is much narrower than the broad title and subtitle suggest, and readers will have to look elsewhere for a thorough natural history of water."
The parts are considerably better than the whole in this disjointed work on water (``the blood of land'') in North America. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Emma Straub
author of MODERN LOVERS
May 30, 2016

In Emma Straub’s new novel Modern Lovers, friends and former college bandmates Elizabeth and Andrew and Zoe have watched one another marry, buy real estate, and start businesses and families, all while trying to hold on to the identities of their youth. But nothing ages them like having to suddenly pass the torch (of sexuality, independence, and the ineffable alchemy of cool) to their own offspring. Back in the band’s heyday, Elizabeth put on a snarl over her Midwestern smile, Andrew let his unwashed hair grow past his chin, and Zoe was the lesbian all the straight women wanted to sleep with. Now nearing fifty, they all live within shouting distance in the same neighborhood deep in gentrified Brooklyn, and the trappings of the adult world seem to have arrived with ease. But the summer that their children reach maturity (and start sleeping together), the fabric of the adult lives suddenly begins to unravel, and the secrets and revelations that are finally let loose—about themselves, and about the famous fourth band member who soared and fell without them—can never be reclaimed. “Straub’s characters are a quirky and interesting bunch, well aware of their own good fortune, and it’s a pleasure spending time with them in leafy Ditmas Park,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >