Nature & Travel Book Reviews (page 206)

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 21, 1998

"Social history at its best. (b&w photos)"
In this extensively researched biography, historian and journalist Cuthbertson (Inside: The Biography of John Gunther, 1992) brings to life the inspired individualism of one of this century's least recognized and most interesting journalists, Emily Hahn. Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: May 11, 1998

"Good dog, lovely book."
A love song to a departed golden retriever, keen and tender, from Vanderbilt (Fortune's Children, 1989). Read full book review >

ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: May 4, 1998

"Readers will likely suspect the fluidness of it all, particularly under the trying circumstances."
Life is unraveling on golf writer Dodson—his much-loved father has died (written about poignantly in Final Rounds, 1996), now his wife wants a divorce'so to blow a little clean air through his spiritual fuel lines, he heads west on a camping/fishing trip with his daughter. Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: May 4, 1998

"As Hess makes all too clear, shelters aren't slaughterhouses but sanctuaries, witness—protection programs for animals that are more refugees—from neglect or abuse or abandonment—than strays. (Author tour)"
A revelatory, smartly written account of the workings at an impressive animal shelter in New York State, from Village Voice art critic (and shelter volunteer) Hess. Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: May 4, 1998

"'Walking is what we did,' Bryson states: 800-plus out of the 2,100-plus miles, and that good sliver is sheer comic travel entertainment."
The Appalachian Trail—from Springer Mountain, Ga., to Mount Katahdin, Me.—consists of some five million steps, and Bryson (Notes from a Small Island, 1996, etc.) seems to coax a laugh, and often an unexpectedly startling insight, out of each one he traverses. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 1998

"As an exercise in self-exploration, it isn't much; but, as a trip down a challenging river, it's quite good."
Hoping "to resolve the unresolvable questions of my life,— McCairen became the first woman since the 1950s to make a solo raft trip down the Grand Canyon, coursing the Colorado River from northern Arizona to Lake Mead in 25 days. Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: May 1, 1998

"Taken together, this is rather a hodgepodge of experiences that don't quite fit together, but for the uncritical arm-chair traveler these essays are a nice way to spend an afternoon."
In this light and enjoyable collection of previously published essays, the peripatetic Millman visits some of the more remote precincts on the planet and reports on encounters both exotic and bizarre. Read full book review >
COMING ABOUT by Susan Tyler Hitchcock
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: May 1, 1998

"A grand voyage reduced to trivialities; one wonders what might have been the result if Hitchcock had for a moment stopped looking within and taken a gander around."
From freelance writer Hitchcock, the chronicle of a nine-month sailing journey through the Caribbean that has the atmosphere of an overly long, amateur family-therapy session. Read full book review >
WALK ON WATER by Lorian Hemingway
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: May 1, 1998

"Hemingway's brief but harrowing description of her stay in a detoxification center in January 1988 and her joy at 'being free' of the addiction climaxes this frank, powerful memoir."
In this raw, to-hell-and-back memoir the enormously talented granddaughter of Ernest Hemingway describes, among other things, how she has fished some of the waters—Key West, the Big Two-Hearted River—her grandfather loved, and battled the same self-destructive alcoholism that haunted him. Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: May 1, 1998

"Davidson's accessible, heartfelt portrait of man's deleterious effect on the sea is a sobering examination of the devilishly complex corner humanity is painting itself into. (8 pages color photos, not seen)"
This natural history of coral reefs and our relationship to them delivers a measured but damning indictment of human environmental folly. Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: May 1, 1998

"One can only hope that the throngs attending the exhibition absorb and act on the message."
From a leading paleontologist, a book (not a catalogue) to complement a show: the American Museum of Natural History's first "issues" exhibition, opening this spring in New York City, with curator Eldredge in charge. Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: May 1, 1998

In a narrative that is among the better recent additions to the genre, a personable and resourceful modern-day Henry Stanley traverses half of the African continent by thumb, afoot, and aboard riverboat. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kathleen Kent
author of THE DIME
February 20, 2017

Dallas, Texas is not for the faint of heart. Good thing for Betty Rhyzyk she's from a family of take-no-prisoners Brooklyn police detectives. But in Kathleen Kent’s new novel The Dime, her Big Apple wisdom will only get her so far when she relocates to The Big D, where Mexican drug cartels and cult leaders, deadbeat skells and society wives all battle for sunbaked turf. Betty is as tough as the best of them, but she's deeply shaken when her first investigation goes sideways. Battling a group of unruly subordinates, a persistent stalker, a formidable criminal organization, and an unsupportive girlfriend, the unbreakable Detective Betty Rhyzyk may be reaching her limit. “Violent, sexy, and completely absorbing,” our critic writes in a starred review. “Kent's detective is Sam Spade reincarnated—as a brilliant, modern woman.” View video >