Nature & Travel Book Reviews (page 206)

BIOMIMICRY by Janine M. Benyus
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: June 1, 1997

"Much of interest here, but spare us the cheerleading."
``Doing it nature's way'' is the theme of this wide-eyed-with-wonder exposition of what's going on in a variety of fields—from farming to computer science—as scientists try to emulate natural processes. Read full book review >
JOE AND ME by James Prosek
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: June 1, 1997

"Prosek, now a senior at Yale, may well be on his way to becoming a fine writer of the outdoors. (color paintings by the author, not seen)"
Sweet, innocent, if not particularly artful, recollections of fishing with a local master. Read full book review >

SEA CHANGE by Peter Nichols
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: June 1, 1997

"Though Toad springs a major leak and must be abandoned before reaching its destination, one comes away with the feeling that Nichols has indeed acquitted himself well. (Book-of-the-Month Club alternate selection; author tour)"
A little wooden sailboat, a raft of memories, and the wide blue Atlantic carry sailor Nichols from England to Maine, almost, in this earnest, reflective chronicle. Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: May 19, 1997

"Reading this gripping book is likely to make the would-be sailor feel both awed and a little frightened by nature's remorseless power."
The experience of being caught at sea in the maw of a "perfect'' storm (that is, one formed of an almost unique combination of factors), a monstrous tempest that couldn't get any worse, is spellbindingly captured by Junger, a journalist. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: May 15, 1997

"Even so, his book makes for an armchair traveler's delight. (Author tour)"
A richly observant memoir of a coast-to-coast journey along the US-Canada border, which the author undertook ``a little unsure of how to proceed but eager to see what I could.'' The people along that line, writes novelist Mosher (Northern Borders, 1994, etc.), are a breed apart: self-reliant, tenacious, suspicious of the governments in Washington and Ottawa alike, to the point of harboring secessionist sympathies. Read full book review >

WOMAN THE HUNTER by Mary Zeiss Stange
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: May 7, 1997

"Though the Field & Stream crowd might balk at extended forays into scholarly jargon and feminist theory, Stange grapples head-on with a central philosophical question largely unanswered by sporting literature: Why hunt?"
Mixing autobiographical reflection and scholarly analysis, a woman hunter examines the cultural history of hunting, brilliantly challenging fundamental assumptions about femininity, masculinity, and the relation of humans to the natural world. Read full book review >
SONNET by Lydia Bird
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 1997

"Five thousand stormy miles, and worth most every minute of it, for Bird and for her readers."
It's heavy weather—both meteorologic and emotional—pretty much all the way for Bird on her trans-Atlantic, trans- Mediterranean sail, but the writing goes very smoothly. Read full book review >
BONOBO by Frans de Waal
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: May 1, 1997

"A fascinating, delightfully successful treatment of an arresting creature. (75 color photos, 9 b&w photos, 9 maps and drawings)"
Notes toward an understanding of the bonobo, Africa's most elusive primate, from the always engaging de Waal, a noted primatologist (Good Natured, 1996). Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: May 1, 1997

"A brilliantly told story, and one that won't go begging when the year's literary honors are doled out."
And onto thin ice—Krakauer's (Into the Wild, 1995) hypnotic, rattling, firsthand account of a commercial expedition up Mt. Everest that went way wrong. Read full book review >
THE RETURN OF THE WOLF TO YELLOWSTONE by Thomas McNamee
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: May 1, 1997

"A good one-volume reference for fans of Canis lupus, although the story has been widely reported elsewhere, such as in Rick McIntyre's War Against the Wolf."
A thoughtful account of the timber wolf's return to the Northern Rockies. ``It has been sixty years, thirty wolf generations, since the last wolf pups were poisoned in the Yellowstone,'' writes McNamee (A Story of Deep Delight, 1990). Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 1, 1997

"After reading this book, you might be inclined to think so."
Old-fashioned muckraking against ``big oil and big coal'' meets new scientific theories on global warming. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: May 1, 1997

Actually, Maxwell (former natural history columnist for Audubon) knows very well why she swallowed the fly—for the rapt feeling of connection with her homeplace, the outdoors, and her departed father—and she tells her tale with both levity and flair. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Andrea Beaty
August 30, 2016

In Andrea Beaty and David Roberts’ new picture book Ada Twist, Scientist is like her classmates, builder Iggy and inventor Rosie: scientist Ada, a character of color, has a boundless imagination and has always been hopelessly curious. Why are there pointy things stuck to a rose? Why are there hairs growing inside your nose? When her house fills with a horrific, toe-curling smell, Ada knows it’s up to her to find the source. Not afraid of failure, she embarks on a fact-finding mission and conducts scientific experiments, all in the name of discovery. But this time, her experiments lead to even more stink and get her into trouble! Inspired by real-life makers such as Ada Lovelace and Marie Curie, Ada Twist, Scientist champions girl power and women scientists, and brings welcome diversity to picture books about girls in science. “Cool and stylish,” our reviewer writes. View video >