Nature & Travel Book Reviews (page 3)

SKYFARING by Mark Vanhoenacker
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 3, 2015

"The anatomy of an airliner and peripatetic aerial travel, as well as a sophisticated worldview, combine for first-class reading—sure to enhance your next flight."
Vanhoenacker's workplace is the cockpit of a 747. Leaving a contrail of information with lapidary prose, he shows why he loves his job. Read full book review >
THE FLY TRAP by Fredrik Sjöberg
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 2, 2015

"In sharing the experience of solitude and reflection, Sjöberg invites readers to see through his eyes, in language that is often poetic, sometimes inscrutable."
A literary memoir by the Swedish author, a man who lives on an island and collects flies, reflecting on the significance of his obsession. Read full book review >

THE WEATHER EXPERIMENT by Peter Moore
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 2, 2015

"Detailed and insightful, this book is as relevant as ever in this era of rapid climate change."
In 1800, no one had a clue about what controlled "the heavens," which made the unlikely science of meteorology one of the most remarkable accomplishments of the 19th century. Read full book review >
GEORGE THE DOG, JOHN THE ARTIST by John Dolan
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 2, 2015

"A disarmingly modest yet profound tale of redemption."
The story of a desperately poor Londoner and a twice-abandoned Staffordshire bull terrier named George poses the question, "Who rescued whom?" Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: June 2, 2015

"A gripping story whose grasp sometimes loosens in explanatory passages."
A reporter for the Washington Post debuts with the forgotten story of a pilot whose B-24 crashed near the Charley River in some of Alaska's most remote territory in December 1943.Read full book review >

TEACHING PLATO IN PALESTINE by Carlos Fraenkel
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 1, 2015

"Fresh, iconoclastic, stimulating debates."
A valiant attempt to provoke philosophical questions about identity and purpose in unlikely hotspots. Read full book review >
THE WORLD ON A PLATE by Mina Holland
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 26, 2015

"A culinary adventure that delights on many levels and leaves readers hungering for more."
In her first book, Guardian Cook editor Holland salutes classic dishes from a few dozen different countries. Read full book review >
DOMESTICATED by Richard C. Francis
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: May 25, 2015

"A highly illuminating look at the cross-species biological basis for human culture and sociability."
"The human population explosion has been bad for most other living things, but not so for those lucky enough to warrant domestication," writes science journalist Francis (Epigenetics: The Ultimate Mystery of Inheritance, 2011, etc.) in this provocative account of the latest developments in the field of evolutionary biology.Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: May 19, 2015

"Overly sentimental but a great story nevertheless."
As a "streetwise crime reporter [and] hard-bitten war correspondent," Men's Health contributing editor Drury considered himself a "tough guy"—until he decided to write about the nonprofit paws4people, which trains therapy dogs to work with veterans suffering from PTSD.Read full book review >
THE ROSE HOTEL by Rahimeh Andalibian
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 12, 2015

"A powerful and uplifting memoir of tragedy and healing."
A New York-based clinical psychologist tells the moving story of the life-changing trauma she and her family suffered as a result of the Iranian Revolution of 1979. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 12, 2015

"A colorfully descriptive memoir of life as a writer working the Paris fashion beat."
One woman's passionate pursuit of fashion in the City of Light. Read full book review >
CITY BY CITY by Keith Gessen
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: May 12, 2015

"From Whittier, Alaska, to Williston, North Dakota, to Palm Coast, Florida, these varied essays offer compelling snapshots of how Americans live, move, and work."
In these 37 singular essays, some reading like research papers, others as personal as memoirs, n+1 editor Gessen (All the Sad Young Literary Men, 2008, etc.) and Harvard graduate student Squibb find in certain American cities the crucible of enormous change since the financial meltdown of 2008.Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Sabaa Tahir
August 4, 2015

Sabaa Tahir’s novel An Ember in the Ashes reveals a world inspired by ancient Rome and defined by brutality. Seventeen-year-old Laia has grown up with one rule for survival: Never challenge the Empire. But when Laia’s brother Darin is arrested for treason, she leaves behind everything she knows, risking her life to try and save him. She enlists help from the rebels whose extensive underground network may lead to Darin. Their help comes with a price, though. Laia must infiltrate the Empire’s greatest military academy as a spy. Elias is the Empire’s finest soldier—and its most unwilling one. Thrown together by chance and united by their hatred of the Empire, Laia and Elias will soon discover that their fates are intertwined—and that their choices may change the destiny of the entire Empire. We talk to An Ember in the Ashes author Sabaa Tahir this week on Kirkus TV. View video >