Nature & Travel Book Reviews (page 3)

DISCONTENT AND ITS CIVILIZATIONS by Mohsin Hamid
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 24, 2015

"Passion and hope infuse Hamid's most incisive dispatches."
An acclaimed novelist reports on peril, war and peace. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Feb. 17, 2015

"A work of enormous heart as well as research."
A satisfying, elegant personal journey in China's fabled Northeast. Read full book review >

TEN MILLION ALIENS by Simon Barnes
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Feb. 17, 2015

"Barnes' tour of life is entertaining and informative, though it doesn't hold a candle to the likes of Ackerman, Durrell and Attenborough."
British sportswriter Barnes (The Meaning of Sport, 2005, etc.) takes a stretch to write about the 10 million species, more or less, that share the world with humankind.Read full book review >
MEET ME IN VENICE by Suzanne Ma
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 16, 2015

"A genial, informative chronicle of the hopes and dreams of a Chinese immigrant."
A Chinese teenager's saga immigrating from Eastern China to Italy. Read full book review >
ALL THE WRONG PLACES by Philip Connors
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 16, 2015

"Unlike other, neater narratives of being lost and found, Connors' story—told with harrowing insight and fierce prose—is messy and incomplete and makes no apologies for being anything but."
Connors (Fire Season: Field Notes from a Wilderness Lookout, 2012) reflects candidly on the years he spent unmoored after a family tragedy; he continuously found himself in places he felt apart from.Read full book review >

WIDE-OPEN WORLD by John Marshall
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 10, 2015

"A great armchair adventure that should inspire others to consider voluntourism as a way to help others and see the world."
One family's adventures volunteering in foreign countries. Read full book review >
GRANADA by Steven Nightingale
HISTORY
Released: Feb. 10, 2015

"A romantic, at times overly sentimental homage to a city 'perfected by catastrophe' and transformed into a place of 'concentrated joy.'"
Poet and novelist Nightingale (The Wings of What You Say, 2013, etc.) makes his nonfiction debut in this rhapsodic paean to the Spanish city, where he, his wife and young daughter now live part of each year.
Read full book review >
THE BEAUTIFUL UNSEEN by Kyle Boelte
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 10, 2015

"In this occasionally overwrought but often moving memoir, Boelte ends with a different perspective than when he started."
An extended meditation on fog, perception, memory and mortality. Read full book review >
PEAKS ON THE HORIZON by Charlie Carroll
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 10, 2015

"A gripping, enlightening journey."
An English traveler examines the occupation of Tibet firsthand while crossing paths with a Tibetan refugee whose life exemplifies that conflict. Read full book review >
DISPLACEMENT by Lucy Knisley
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 8, 2015

"A moving but also very funny meditation on time, age and grace."
A 20-something cartoonist with a unique sense of humor sets off on a cruise to the Caribbean with her nonagenarian grandparents. Read full book review >
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Feb. 3, 2015

"Brandow's vitriolic style can be distracting, but his message is serious."
A no-holds-barred defense of dogs that are the hapless victims of their clueless owners. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Feb. 3, 2015

"A meticulously detailed feat of rare footage inside the DPRK's propaganda machinery."
Exhaustively researched, highly engrossing chronicle of the outrageous abduction of a pair of well-known South Korean filmmakers by the nefarious network of North Korea's Kim Jong-Il. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frank Bruni
March 31, 2015

Over the last few decades, Americans have turned college admissions into a terrifying and occasionally devastating process, preceded by test prep, tutors, all sorts of stratagems, all kinds of rankings, and a conviction among too many young people that their futures will be determined and their worth established by which schools say yes and which say no. In Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be, New York Times columnist Frank Bruni explains why, giving students and their parents a new perspective on this brutal, deeply flawed competition and a path out of the anxiety that it provokes. “Written in a lively style but carrying a wallop, this is a book that family and educators cannot afford to overlook as they try to navigate the treacherous waters of college admissions,” our reviewer writes. View video >