Nature & Travel Book Reviews (page 34)

NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: April 4, 2003

"Supremely well told: a fine exception to the dull run of most geological writing."
A vivid reconstruction of a volcanic explosion felt around the world—and a tale of curious twists it is. Read full book review >
THE PATH by Chet Raymo
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: April 1, 2003

"A little masterpiece combining the individual and the cosmic with a fine but unflinching eye: informative, captivating, heartfelt."
Raymo (Skeptics and True Believers, 1998, etc.) again proves himself a masterful scientist and affable guide as, simply by drawing on his daily walk to work, he shows how everything in the universe is connected to everything else. Read full book review >

NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: March 4, 2003

"First-rate report from a land even environmentalists forgot."
Travel journalist Tidwell (Amazon Stranger, 1996, etc.) takes a lingering, eye-opening look at the bayous and marshlands of West Louisiana. Read full book review >
HIGH LATITUDES by Farley Mowat
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 2003

"A fine slice out of Mowat time, along with the sound of voices so remote that they take your breath away and rouse your instinct to wonder—just as Mowat wished."
A 1966 journey across northern Canada, much of it above the Arctic Circle. Read full book review >
THE RURAL LIFE by Verlyn Klinkenborg
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Dec. 2, 2002

"Nonfiction storytelling at its highest: unflaggingly lovely, with scope, profundity, and power achieved through a mastering of the delicate."
From the New York Times writer (The Last Fine Time, 1990) and editorial-board member, a gathering of pieces that have appeared over the years (mainly in the Times) quilted into a single year, a chapter a month. Result: captivating, subtle, and splendid. Read full book review >

THE BEST AMERICAN TRAVEL WRITING 2002 by Frances Mayes
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Oct. 15, 2002

"Dazzles with its fantastic variety."
Stellar work with a 360-degree gaze, reporting on places both exotic and familiar. Read full book review >
IN RUINS by Christopher Woodward
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 8, 2002

"Rich, allusive, learned, delightful. (42 illustrations)"
A perceptive British museum director speculates on the significance of architectural ruins for artists, writers, and the rest of us. Read full book review >
STRANGER ON A TRAIN by Jenny Diski
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 2002

"Wry, graceful commentary on the oddity of the human condition."
A British writer in search of solitude takes two epic train journeys across the US, only to find herself inexorably drawn into a community of strangers. Read full book review >
THE FOUNDING FISH by John McPhee
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Oct. 1, 2002

"'I'm a shad fisherman,' says McPhee. True, but also a talented portraitist of the fish, a Gilbert Stuart of the species, and a William Hogarth, too, sticking an elbow into the ribs of his obsession."
A blue-chip tour of the American shad from McPhee (Annals of the Former World, 1998, etc.), maestro of the extended essay, if not the fly rod. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Aug. 14, 2002

"Consider inviting Tatiana to your next dinner party—most assuredly there'll never be a dull moment."
In the guise of an advice-to-the-lovelorn column, evolutionary biologist Judson masterfully conveys astonishing facts and figures about the sex lives of many, many creatures great and small. Read full book review >
LAND’S END by Michael Cunningham
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Aug. 1, 2002

"And 'if I die tomorrow, Provincetown is where I want my ashes scattered.' That's a sense of place called home."
A leisurely walking tour and shrewd exposition of that "eccentrics' sanctuary"—Provincetown, Massachusetts—from Pulitzer-winning novelist Cunningham (The Hours, 1998, etc.). Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 22, 2002

"Smart, evocative, and memorable: nature-writing done right."
Lyrical nature essays set mostly in the American Southwest, with excursions to the tropics to escape the desert sun. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fatima Bhutto
April 14, 2015

Set during the American invasion of Afghanistan, Fatima Bhutto’s debut novel The Shadow of the Crescent Moon begins and ends one rain-swept Friday morning in Mir Ali, a small town in Pakistan’s Tribal Areas close to the Afghan border. Three brothers meet for breakfast. Soon after, the eldest, Aman Erum, recently returned from America, hails a taxi to the local mosque. Sikandar, a doctor, drives to the hospital where he works, but must first stop to collect his troubled wife, who has not joined the family that morning. No one knows where Mina goes these days. But when, later in the morning, the two are taken hostage by members of the Taliban, Mina will prove to be stronger than anyone could have imagined. Our reviewer writes that The Shadow of the Crescent Moon is “a timely, earnest portrait of a family torn apart by the machinations of other people’s war games and desperately trying to survive.” View video >