Nature & Travel Book Reviews (page 4)

Poor Will's Almanack for 2017 by Bill Felker
Released: Aug. 30, 2016

"While the weather forecasts may be debatable, this almanac still features beautiful essays by the author and some useful details about seasonal events and gardening."
An annual almanac attempts to predict weather-related phenomena based on patterns observed in previous years. Read full book review >
Released: Aug. 23, 2016

"A sprawling, vibrant book about soccer in Argentina, a country where the sport is every bit as important and reflective of the society as it is anywhere in the world."
The history of soccer and its singular place in Argentine society. Read full book review >

Released: Aug. 23, 2016

"The author's elegant narrative conveys how the love for these amazing creatures transcends national animosities."
A singular spotlight on the concerted World War II effort to save Lipizzaner stallions. Read full book review >
Released: Aug. 16, 2016

"Amid the author's personal journey reside priceless cultural and professional insights."
The experiences of an American couple in South Korea underscore how little the West really knows about the country. Read full book review >
RIVERINE by Angela Palm
Released: Aug. 16, 2016

"An intelligent, evocative, and richly textured memoir."
The haunting account of how the author tried to escape her rural Indiana past. Read full book review >

Released: Aug. 15, 2016

"All this from an author who admits, 'I am a chicken historian who does not actually like eating chicken,' but who finds the bird as fascinating as she makes it for readers."
In her first book, a food historian with a feature writer's flair illuminates the culinary history of the now-ubiquitous chicken. Read full book review >
UTOPIA DRIVE by Erik Reece
Released: Aug. 9, 2016

"Compelling narratives with a personal voice, with some utopian political bite."
A journalist and author drives his truck around the East visiting utopian communities—past and present—and concludes we need to think more like those folks. Read full book review >
VENOMOUS by Christie Wilcox
Released: Aug. 9, 2016

"Wilcox writes in a lively style, but the book is likely of greatest interest to those already drawn to the subject."
How the creatures that embody some of mankind's deepest fears use toxic substances to defend themselves against predators and to prey on the creatures they eat—and why this is important to us today. Read full book review >
LANDMARKS by Robert Macfarlane
Released: Aug. 2, 2016

"Lucent, lyrical prose evokes Macfarlane's aesthetic, ethical, and powerfully tactile response to nature's enchantments."
A prizewinning naturalist explores the connection between what we say and how we see. Read full book review >
Released: Aug. 2, 2016

"A pleasing romp: punk in attitude but literary in execution and a fine work of armchair travel for those unwilling to strap on an accordion on the streets of Rostov for themselves."
Want to see the seamy side of a country? Go on tour as a rock musician. Read full book review >
WILD SEX by Carin Bondar
Released: Aug. 1, 2016

"A fascinating peek into the intimate behavior of our animal cousins that provides new insight into the benefits of being human."
A lively exploration of "the nitty-gritty of the diverse sex life of animals." Read full book review >
LOVE AND RUIN by Evan Ratliff
Released: July 26, 2016

"An eclectic, never-boring collection."
Atavist magazine editor Ratliff brings together 10 pieces of journalism selected from the site's five-year history. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
H.W. Brands
October 11, 2016

As noted historian H.W. Brands reveals in his new book The General vs. the President: MacArthur and Truman at the Brink of Nuclear War, at the height of the Korean War, President Harry S. Truman committed a gaffe that sent shock waves around the world. When asked by a reporter about the possible use of atomic weapons in response to China's entry into the war, Truman replied testily, "The military commander in the field will have charge of the use of the weapons, as he always has." This suggested that General Douglas MacArthur, the willful, fearless, and highly decorated commander of the American and U.N. forces, had his finger on the nuclear trigger. A correction quickly followed, but the damage was done; two visions for America's path forward were clearly in opposition, and one man would have to make way. Truman was one of the most unpopular presidents in American history. General MacArthur, by contrast, was incredibly popular, as untouchable as any officer has ever been in America. The contest of wills between these two titanic characters unfolds against the turbulent backdrop of a faraway war and terrors conjured at home by Joseph McCarthy. “An exciting, well-written comparison study of two American leaders at loggerheads during the Korean War crisis,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >