Nature & Travel Book Reviews (page 4)

TAKE TO THE HIGHWAY by Bryce Milligan
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Sept. 1, 2016

"Sure-handed verse work in multiple registers."
In a new collection "for travelers," Milligan sometimes races and sometimes tools along; no matter the speed, it's a pleasing ride. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Aug. 23, 2016

"A sprawling, vibrant book about soccer in Argentina, a country where the sport is every bit as important and reflective of the society as it is anywhere in the world."
The history of soccer and its singular place in Argentine society. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: Aug. 23, 2016

"The author's elegant narrative conveys how the love for these amazing creatures transcends national animosities."
A singular spotlight on the concerted World War II effort to save Lipizzaner stallions. Read full book review >
RIVERINE by Angela Palm
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 16, 2016

"An intelligent, evocative, and richly textured memoir."
The haunting account of how the author tried to escape her rural Indiana past. Read full book review >
TASTES LIKE CHICKEN by Emelyn Rude
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Aug. 15, 2016

"All this from an author who admits, 'I am a chicken historian who does not actually like eating chicken,' but who finds the bird as fascinating as she makes it for readers."
In her first book, a food historian with a feature writer's flair illuminates the culinary history of the now-ubiquitous chicken. Read full book review >

UTOPIA DRIVE by Erik Reece
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 9, 2016

"Compelling narratives with a personal voice, with some utopian political bite."
A journalist and author drives his truck around the East visiting utopian communities—past and present—and concludes we need to think more like those folks. Read full book review >
LANDMARKS by Robert Macfarlane
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 2, 2016

"Lucent, lyrical prose evokes Macfarlane's aesthetic, ethical, and powerfully tactile response to nature's enchantments."
A prizewinning naturalist explores the connection between what we say and how we see. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 2, 2016

"A pleasing romp: punk in attitude but literary in execution and a fine work of armchair travel for those unwilling to strap on an accordion on the streets of Rostov for themselves."
Want to see the seamy side of a country? Go on tour as a rock musician. Read full book review >
WILD SEX by Carin Bondar
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Aug. 1, 2016

"A fascinating peek into the intimate behavior of our animal cousins that provides new insight into the benefits of being human."
A lively exploration of "the nitty-gritty of the diverse sex life of animals." Read full book review >
LOVE AND RUIN by Evan Ratliff
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: July 26, 2016

"An eclectic, never-boring collection."
Atavist magazine editor Ratliff brings together 10 pieces of journalism selected from the site's five-year history. Read full book review >
AND SOON I HEARD A ROARING WIND by Bill Streever
HISTORY
Released: July 26, 2016

"Streever has a knack for blending his research and personal experience into an easy-to-read account that is hard to put down. Recommended for general readers curious about the natural world as well as budding scientists."
Science, history, and personal adventure come together in a wild and witty exploration of wind. Read full book review >
THE MAN WHO MADE THINGS OUT OF TREES by Robert Penn
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 26, 2016

"An appreciative, environmentally sound reminder of how trees benefit and cultivate life on Earth."
A lifelong nature lover explores the versatility of the ash tree. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Yoojin Grace Wuertz
February 27, 2017

In Yoojin Grace Wuertz’s debut novel Everything Belongs to Us, the setting is Seoul in 1978. At South Korea’s top university, the nation’s best and brightest compete to join the professional elite of an authoritarian regime. Success could lead to a life of rarefied privilege and wealth; failure means being left irrevocably behind. For childhood friends Jisun and Namin, the stakes couldn’t be more different. Jisun, the daughter of a powerful business mogul, grew up on a mountainside estate with lush gardens and a dedicated chauffeur. Namin’s parents run a tented food cart from dawn to curfew; her sister works in a shoe factory. Now Jisun wants as little to do with her father’s world as possible, abandoning her schoolwork in favor of the underground activist movement, while Namin studies tirelessly in the service of one goal: to launch herself and her family out of poverty. But everything changes when Jisun and Namin meet an ambitious, charming student named Sunam, whose need to please his family has led him to a prestigious club: the Circle. Under the influence of his mentor, Juno, a manipulative social climber, Sunam becomes entangled with both women, as they all make choices that will change their lives forever. “Engrossing,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. “Wuertz is an important new voice in American fiction.” View video >