Nature & Travel Book Reviews (page 5)

FRANCE by Jonathan Fenby
HISTORY
Released: Nov. 8, 2016

"A capable history sure to appeal to all lovers of France."
Fenby (Will China Dominate the 21st Century?, 2014, etc.) investigates France's attempts to live up to her revolutionary ideals and how she has become a prisoner of her history and its narratives. Read full book review >
ONE WITH THE TIGER by Steven Church
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 8, 2016

"A powerfully written attention-grabber with a questionable message."
An exploration of the fascination with the "savage and the wild inside" us, which fuels the human desire "to get intimately close to apex predators." Read full book review >

COAST RANGE by Nick Neely
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 8, 2016

"Neely capably explores the complexity of his subjects with polish and finesse, looking carefully and thinking deeply."
A collection of essays that focuses on the interaction between humans and the natural world in and around the Rogue River in Oregon, where the author spent six months doing a writing residency. Read full book review >
CRASHING THE PARTY by Scott Savitt
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 8, 2016

"An energetic memoir that captures the collision between an open-hearted iconoclast and a free-market totalitarian state."
Passionate account of an American journalist witnessing China's pro-Western awakening and the authoritarian pushback. Read full book review >
RAINBOW DUST by Peter Marren
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 2016

"An erudite, engaging book that will find the broadest readership among nature lovers on the other side of the Atlantic."
A prizewinning British wildlife writer reveals the special place of butterflies in our imagination and cultural life. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Nov. 1, 2016

"Experiencing North Korean 'method acting' in the most visceral way."
An ingenious method of penetrating the most isolated country in the world allows an Australian filmmaker access to what proves to be a surprisingly sympathetic North Korean soul. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Nov. 1, 2016

"Long, leisurely, and vastly entertaining."
The story of a 1913 Arctic expedition to investigate what the New York Tribune called "the last considerable mass of unknown land on our planet." Read full book review >
BLACK SQUARE by Sophie Pinkham
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 2016

"First-rate reporting, research, and writing in a debut that will make readers care as much as the author does."
A journalist's first book, a graceful mix of personal memoir and political research, illuminates the complexities of Ukraine culture. Read full book review >
DRAGONS IN DIAMOND VILLAGE by David Bandurski
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Oct. 25, 2016

"An intense look at globalization's tragic hidden costs."
A grim investigation of how urbanization is destroying traditional Chinese communities. Read full book review >
COMMON GROUND by Rob Cowen
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 24, 2016

"An unlikely landscape inspires a memoir of wonder and joy."
A journalist and travel writer pays homage to the "topographic delirium" of marginal lands. Read full book review >
THE LOCAL FOOD REVOLUTION by Michael Brownlee
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Oct. 18, 2016

"A useful, if not original, statement of the centrality of food production to our way of life that could have benefited from a more concise, organized formulation."
An argument that "modern industrial farming amounts to one of the most destructive enterprises on the planet." Read full book review >
THE LION IN THE LIVING ROOM by Abigail Tucker
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Oct. 18, 2016

"Read this entertaining book and you will be convinced that house cats are 'the most transformative invaders the world has ever seen'—except for humans, of course."
The intriguing history of how house cats found their way onto our hearths and into our hearts. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kathleen Kent
author of THE DIME
February 20, 2017

Dallas, Texas is not for the faint of heart. Good thing for Betty Rhyzyk she's from a family of take-no-prisoners Brooklyn police detectives. But in Kathleen Kent’s new novel The Dime, her Big Apple wisdom will only get her so far when she relocates to The Big D, where Mexican drug cartels and cult leaders, deadbeat skells and society wives all battle for sunbaked turf. Betty is as tough as the best of them, but she's deeply shaken when her first investigation goes sideways. Battling a group of unruly subordinates, a persistent stalker, a formidable criminal organization, and an unsupportive girlfriend, the unbreakable Detective Betty Rhyzyk may be reaching her limit. “Violent, sexy, and completely absorbing,” our critic writes in a starred review. “Kent's detective is Sam Spade reincarnated—as a brilliant, modern woman.” View video >