Nature & Travel Book Reviews (page 6)

SMOKE THE DONKEY by Cate Folsom
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 2016

"A good read for Marines and their families as well as animal lovers."
The story of a Marine and the local donkey he adopted as a mascot for his troops. Read full book review >
THE SOLACE OF STONES by Julie Riddle
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 2016

"Evocative prose illuminates the narrative's people and places, but the author's prolonged self-absorption eventually becomes tedious."
Riddle (Senior Writer/Whitworth Univ.) chronicles her life growing up in the Montana wilderness. Read full book review >

THE WANDER SOCIETY by Keri Smith
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: March 29, 2016

"The amusing and informative philosophy of a hidden culture that proposes that wandering is the key to a soulful life."
A guidebook to aimless wandering. Read full book review >
IN SEARCH OF BUDDHA'S DAUGHTERS by Christine Toomey
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 22, 2016

"An inspiring and necessary addition to the body of work about modern-day Buddhism."
A British journalist's account of her yearlong investigation into the lives and motivations of women who chose to become Buddhist nuns. Read full book review >
ALMOST HOME by Githa Hariharan
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 22, 2016

"An uneven collection—never just travel writing or political analysis—that nonetheless seems to map new territory of its own."
Essays on identity, place, and the pervasiveness of the past in the present, by a global literary citizen. Read full book review >

THE MIND CLUB by Daniel M. Wegner
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: March 22, 2016

"Complex science lightly delivered; a pleasure for anyone comfortable with the thought that knowing others' minds will improve our own."
Do the dead have thoughts? The late Harvard psychology professor Wegner (The Illusion of Conscious Will, 2002, etc.), assisted by neuroscientist Gray (Mind Perception and Morality/Univ. of North Carolina), ponders that ethereal question and much more.Read full book review >
50 GREAT AMERICAN PLACES by Brent D. Glass
HISTORY
Released: March 15, 2016

"An enlightening trip with an expert guide."
A journey in search of the nation's history. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 15, 2016

"Witty and engaging, this book simultaneously celebrates and challenges spiritual traditions."
In this evenhanded book, Wexler (Boston Univ. School of Law; Tuttle in the Balance, 2015, etc.) chronicles his travels around the world in search of spiritual practices that threaten environmental stewardship.Read full book review >
WHERE WE WANT TO LIVE by Ryan Gravel
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 15, 2016

"An uplifting story about what people can accomplish working for a common purpose they make their own."
An autobiographical account of the reclamation of Atlanta's Beltline and its potential contribution to building a new urban culture for this century. Read full book review >
THE RAREST BIRD IN THE WORLD by Vernon R.L. Head
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 15, 2016

"Die-hard bird-watchers may forgive Head's indulgences, but others may wish for a crisper telling."
A dedicated bird-watcher's narrative of a quest for the Nechisar Nightjar, a bird never seen live, known only to scientists by a single wing found in 1990. Read full book review >
RIGHTFUL HERITAGE by Douglas Brinkley
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 15, 2016

"Overlong, as are so many of Brinkley's books, but a brightly written, highly useful argument, especially in a time when the public domain is under siege."
Brinkley (History/Rice Univ.; Cronkite, 2012, etc.) returns with the provocative argument that Theodore Roosevelt was not the only environmentalist in the Roosevelt clan—far from it.Read full book review >
MY BRAIN ON FIRE by Leonard Pitt
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 8, 2016

"From start to finish, Pitt's memoir is a lively autodidactic romp through a life well-lived in both mind and body."
A theater actor's memoir of a life and way of thinking permanently altered by the seven years he spent as a young man living in 1960s Paris. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Emma Straub
author of MODERN LOVERS
May 30, 2016

In Emma Straub’s new novel Modern Lovers, friends and former college bandmates Elizabeth and Andrew and Zoe have watched one another marry, buy real estate, and start businesses and families, all while trying to hold on to the identities of their youth. But nothing ages them like having to suddenly pass the torch (of sexuality, independence, and the ineffable alchemy of cool) to their own offspring. Back in the band’s heyday, Elizabeth put on a snarl over her Midwestern smile, Andrew let his unwashed hair grow past his chin, and Zoe was the lesbian all the straight women wanted to sleep with. Now nearing fifty, they all live within shouting distance in the same neighborhood deep in gentrified Brooklyn, and the trappings of the adult world seem to have arrived with ease. But the summer that their children reach maturity (and start sleeping together), the fabric of the adult lives suddenly begins to unravel, and the secrets and revelations that are finally let loose—about themselves, and about the famous fourth band member who soared and fell without them—can never be reclaimed. “Straub’s characters are a quirky and interesting bunch, well aware of their own good fortune, and it’s a pleasure spending time with them in leafy Ditmas Park,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >