Nature & Travel Book Reviews (page 7)

HALF-EARTH by Edward O. Wilson
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: March 7, 2016

"Not so much a potent plan as another informed plea for humanity to act as stewards of the biosphere rather than owners."
The noted naturalist and Pulitzer Prize-winning author again waxes eloquent on behalf of the biosphere. Read full book review >
ERUPTION by Steve Olson
HISTORY
Released: March 7, 2016

"A riveting trek combining enthralling nature writing with engaging social history."
A National Book Award finalist unravels the compelling back story of the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens. Read full book review >

THE END OF KARMA by Somini Sengupta
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 7, 2016

"A compelling portrait of what will soon be the world's most populous nation, one on the verge of great change—for better or worse."
India's young population is growing dramatically, writes Indian-American journalist Sengupta—and it's growing impatient with the roadblocks its elders have erected. Read full book review >
GARDENS OF AWE AND FOLLY by Vivian Swift
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 2016

"A breezy, whimsical book that does its best to approximate the renewal one might feel upon visiting a garden."
A charming stroll through some public gardens. Read full book review >
LOCALLY LAID by Lucie B. Amundsen
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 2016

"Don't let Amundsen's self-deprecating humor fool you into taking this book lightly. In between capers, she makes a nuanced plea to respect local farms and the animals that populate them."
One family's attempt to get out of the rat race and into the poultry race. Read full book review >

I HAD TO SURVIVE by Roberto Canessa
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 2016

"Readably inspiring from beginning to end."
A world-famous pediatric cardiologist tells how surviving a plane crash in the high Andes led to a lifelong commitment to helping children overcome congenital heart defects. Read full book review >
POWERING FORWARD by Bill Ritter
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 1, 2016

"Ritter lacks the pizzazz of Sernovitz, who sees another kind of energy revolution taking place, but he presents arguments cleanly and forcefully."
An informative why-and-how book about preventing climate change by making the transition to clean energy. Read full book review >
FACING CLIMATE CHANGE by Jeffrey T. Kiehl
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: March 1, 2016

"In this slim book, Kiehl argues that social problems such as climate change should be viewed from a more comprehensive psychological perspective, an approach that practical-minded policymakers may regard as touchy-feely and impractical."
Psychology provides an answer to the question of why so little has been done to address the problem of climate change. Read full book review >
PEREGRINE SPRING by Nancy Cowan
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 2016

"Falconry sets Cowan's heart free to fly, but many readers may feel moored to the perch."
Wildlife rehabilitator and master falconer Cowan chronicles 30 years immersed in the sport of falconry, conveying the challenges, triumphs, and occasional heartbreaks of an activity requiring hard-won skill and a willingness to see nature from a different perspective. Read full book review >
RISING GROUND by Philip Marsden
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 2016

"The writer/traveler blends so thoroughly with the landscape that it's sometimes affectingly uncertain which is speaking."
A native of Cornwall, England, returns with an account of a walk southwestward across the region to Land's End. Read full book review >
DREAMING OF LIONS by Elizabeth Marshall Thomas
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 26, 2016

"A candid and humane memoir of a fascinating life."
A novelist and bestselling nonfiction writer's account of her life and how she became a respected observer of the natural world. Read full book review >
MEATHOOKED by Marta Zaraska
FOOD & COOKING
Released: Feb. 23, 2016

"A well-researched, refreshingly optimistic look at a serious issue, free of ideological preconceptions."
With an open mind, a vegetarian journalist examines our "love affair with meat." Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fernanda Santos
author of THE FIRE LINE
May 17, 2016

When a bolt of lightning ignited a hilltop in the sleepy town of Yarnell, Arizona, in June 2013, setting off a blaze that would grow into one of the deadliest fires in American history, the 20 men who made up the Granite Mountain Hotshots sprang into action. New York Times writer Fernanda Santos’ debut book The Fire Line is the story of the fire and the Hotshots’ attempts to extinguish it. An elite crew trained to combat the most challenging wildfires, the Hotshots were a ragtag family, crisscrossing the American West and wherever else the fires took them. There's Eric Marsh, their devoted and demanding superintendent who turned his own personal demons into lessons he used to mold, train and guide his crew; Jesse Steed, their captain, a former Marine, a beast on the fire line and a family man who wasn’t afraid to say “I love you” to the firemen he led; Andrew Ashcraft, a team leader still in his 20s who struggled to balance his love for his beautiful wife and four children and his passion for fighting wildfires. We see this band of brothers at work, at play and at home, until a fire that burned in their own backyards leads to a national tragedy. View video >