Nature & Travel Book Reviews (page 8)

BARBARIAN DAYS by William Finnegan
Released: July 21, 2015

"A lyrical and intense memoir."
An award-winning staff writer for the New Yorker offers a probing account of his lifetime passion for surfing.Read full book review >
SPIRALS IN TIME by Helen Scales
Released: July 21, 2015

"An enchanting, accessible tour of the seashell and its place and purpose within the natural world."
British marine biologist Scales (Poseidon's Steed: The Story of Seahorses, from Myth to Reality, 2009) reinvigorates conchology and the lost art of seashell appreciation.Read full book review >

Released: July 21, 2015

"A volume that is like a Eurail Pass that will carry you through gorgeous terrain you will want to explore in more depth."
With a subtitle that serves as a swift, sweet summary, an adjunct professor (Entomology and Ecology, Evolutionary Biology/Univ. of Arizona) compresses the cultural and natural history of flowers into a few hundred graceful pages. Read full book review >
GREEN HILLS OF AFRICA by Ernest Hemingway
Released: July 21, 2015

"Papa's best and worst on full display, sometimes in the same paragraph."
A Hemingway son and grandson present a reprinting of their ancestor's 1935 work (Hemingway Library Edition) along with some illuminating supplementary material. Read full book review >
Released: July 15, 2015

"Not for the fainthearted, but a good wake-up call for those concerned with decent treatment of animals and healthy food on the table."
A searing exposé of the brutal treatment animals receive on their ways to our dinner plates. Read full book review >

Released: July 14, 2015

"A feel-good, bittersweet memoir with few surprises."
Veterinarian Vogelsang pays tribute to the dogs that have played important roles in her life and professional practice. Read full book review >
DRIVING HUNGRY by Layne Mosler
Released: July 14, 2015

"Mosler's lively and accessible writing style joyfully captures the satisfaction gained by trusting your instincts and seeking out new places, food, and people."
Building on the success of her blog, Taxi Gourmet, Mosler recounts the story of her transcontinental search for a vocation, which propelled the author into dancing in tango clubs in Buenos Aires, becoming a cab driver in New York City, and falling in love with the city of Berlin. Read full book review >
Released: July 14, 2015

"A commendable investigation of the nature of reality."
Nobel Prize winner Wilczek (Physics/MIT; The Lightness of Being: Mass, Ether and the Unification of Forces, 2008, etc.) posits that a powerful Creator made the world because of "an impulse to make something beautiful."Read full book review >
BEYOND WORDS by Carl Safina
Released: July 14, 2015

"A profound, scientifically based appeal for recognition of the kinship of all living things."
Award-winning ecologist Safina (Nature and Humanity/Stony Brook Univ.; The View from Lazy Point: A Natural Year in an Unnatural World, 2011 etc.) disputes the dogma among scientists that forbids speculations about the "the inner lives of animals." Read full book review >
The Alternate Compass by Steve A. Anderson
Released: July 4, 2015

"A fine trove of byways—Pig Trail, Twentymile Bottom—with a guide who knows how to stop and smell the hops."
Combination how-to book and guide to the secret pleasures of 21 nationwide highway motorcycle voyages, featuring plenty of craft-brewed beer. Read full book review >
BORN TO BE WILD by Randy D. McBee
Released: July 1, 2015

"A dynamite subject whose explosions are somewhat muted by the generally dispassionate tenor of the text."
A thorough, academic cultural history of the motorcycle and its riders since the second world war. Read full book review >
THE GOOD SHUFU by Tracy Slater
Released: June 30, 2015

"A heartfelt and moving tale, coupling insights into two remarkably different cultures with a love story that, as much as any true love story can, delivers a happy ending."
A writer goes to the far side of the world for work and finds a home. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jason Gay
November 17, 2015

In the 1990s, copies of Richard Carlson’s Don't Sweat the Small Stuff (and its many sequels) were seemingly everywhere, giving readers either the confidence to prioritize their stresses or despondence over the slender volume’s not addressing their particular set of problems. While not the first book of its kind, it kicked open the door for an industry of self-help, worry-reduction advice guides. In his first book, Little Victories, Wall Street Journal sports columnist Gay takes less of a guru approach, though he has drawn an audience of readers appreciative of reportage that balances insights with a droll, self-deprecating outlook. He occasionally focuses his columns on “the Rules” (of Thanksgiving family touch football, the gym, the office holiday party, etc.), which started as a genial poke in the eye at the proliferation of self-help books and, over time, came to explore actual advice “both practical and ridiculous” and “neither perfect nor universal.” The author admirably combines those elements in every piece in the book. View video >