Nature & Travel Book Reviews (page 8)

THE ROAD TO LITTLE DRIBBLING by Bill Bryson
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 19, 2016

"Anglophiles will find Bryson's field notes equally entertaining and educational."
Bryson (One Summer: America, 1927, 2013, etc.) takes us on another fascinating cross-country jaunt.Read full book review >
BLOOD AND EARTH by Kevin Bales
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 19, 2016

"A cleareyed account of man's inhumanity to man and Earth. Read it to get informed, and then take action."
In a heart-wrenching narrative, Bales (Ending Slavery: How We Free Today's Slaves, 2007, etc.) explores modern slavery and the devastating effects on its victims as well as the environmental degradation caused by this morally reprehensible institution.Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 12, 2016

"Though Zoepf demonstrates a few instances of how 'small reform turns out to be even more transformational than its most devoted proponents could have predicted,' the evolving 'personal agency' she witnessed is almost too subtle (yet) to be perceived."
New America Foundation fellow Zoepf attempts to make "the case for small gestures" by extremely circumscribed Arab women. Read full book review >
ALL MONSTERS MUST DIE by Magnus Bärtås
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 12, 2016

"A clear and troubling picture of a country forced to embrace madness."
Two Swedish artists (one visual, the other musical) record their impressions of a one-week sojourn in North Korea in 2008. Read full book review >
ONE BREATH by Adam Skolnick
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 12, 2016

"A worthy addition to the growing body of literature on adventures that test the limits of nature and mankind."
A fatality spurs an inquiry into an extreme sport, illuminating the risks—as well as the rewards—of free diving. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: Jan. 11, 2016

"An unusual and vastly entertaining journey into the world of mysterious plant life as experienced by a gifted nature writer."
A prolific and talented British nature writer explores 40 plant species and how they have influenced the human imagination over the centuries. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 5, 2016

"A somewhat superficial yet entertaining romp."
Where to find innovators. Read full book review >
NO BAGGAGE by Clara Bensen
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 5, 2016

"An engaging memoir of travel, love, and finding oneself."
A 20-something's debut memoir about a whirlwind romance with an eccentric professor who took her on a three-week luggageless trip in Europe. Read full book review >
BLOOD OIL by Leif Wenar
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Jan. 2, 2016

"A fascinating reframing of large and vexing questions. Highly recommended for policymakers and energy strategists as well as students of contemporary philosophy."
A provocative examination of natural resources, their extraction, and their control. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 29, 2015

"Well-intentioned but flawed."
An environmental activist's travelogue about the 104-day coast-to-coast bike ride that he transformed into a radical experiment in low-impact living. Read full book review >
THE CITY AT THREE P.M. by Peter LaSalle
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 15, 2015

"An up-and-down collection of essays on what a fiction writer does when he isn't writing fiction."
A collection of what could be called literary travel criticism. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 15, 2015

"First-rate reporting and erudition underlie this successful effort to re-establish the reputation of an indispensable scientist."
A United States Geological Survey scientist returns with a rich account of one of his predecessors: Thomas Jaggar (1871-1953), a somewhat forgotten pioneer in volcanology. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frances Stroh
author of BEER MONEY
May 3, 2016

Frances Stroh’s earliest memories are ones of great privilege: shopping trips to London and New York, lunches served by black-tied waiters at the Regency Hotel, and a house filled with precious antiques, which she was forbidden to touch. Established in Detroit in 1850, by 1984 the Stroh Brewing Company had become the largest private beer fortune in America and a brand emblematic of the American dream itself; while Stroh was coming of age, the Stroh family fortune was estimated to be worth $700 million. But behind the beautiful façade lay a crumbling foundation. As their fortune dissolved in little over a decade, the family was torn apart internally by divorce and one family member's drug bust; disagreements over the management of the business; and disputes over the remaining money they possessed. “The author’s family might have successfully burned through a massive fortune, but they squandered a lot more than that,” our reviewer writes about Stroh’s debut memoir, Beer Money. “A sorrowful, eye-opening examination of familial dysfunction.” View video >