Nature & Travel Book Reviews (page 9)

THE WANDER SOCIETY by Keri Smith
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: March 29, 2016

"The amusing and informative philosophy of a hidden culture that proposes that wandering is the key to a soulful life."
A guidebook to aimless wandering. Read full book review >
IN SEARCH OF BUDDHA'S DAUGHTERS by Christine Toomey
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 22, 2016

"An inspiring and necessary addition to the body of work about modern-day Buddhism."
A British journalist's account of her yearlong investigation into the lives and motivations of women who chose to become Buddhist nuns. Read full book review >

ALMOST HOME by Githa Hariharan
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 22, 2016

"An uneven collection—never just travel writing or political analysis—that nonetheless seems to map new territory of its own."
Essays on identity, place, and the pervasiveness of the past in the present, by a global literary citizen. Read full book review >
THE MIND CLUB by Daniel M. Wegner
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: March 22, 2016

"Complex science lightly delivered; a pleasure for anyone comfortable with the thought that knowing others' minds will improve our own."
Do the dead have thoughts? The late Harvard psychology professor Wegner (The Illusion of Conscious Will, 2002, etc.), assisted by neuroscientist Gray (Mind Perception and Morality/Univ. of North Carolina), ponders that ethereal question and much more.Read full book review >
50 GREAT AMERICAN PLACES by Brent D. Glass
HISTORY
Released: March 15, 2016

"An enlightening trip with an expert guide."
A journey in search of the nation's history. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 15, 2016

"Witty and engaging, this book simultaneously celebrates and challenges spiritual traditions."
In this evenhanded book, Wexler (Boston Univ. School of Law; Tuttle in the Balance, 2015, etc.) chronicles his travels around the world in search of spiritual practices that threaten environmental stewardship.Read full book review >
WHERE WE WANT TO LIVE by Ryan Gravel
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 15, 2016

"An uplifting story about what people can accomplish working for a common purpose they make their own."
An autobiographical account of the reclamation of Atlanta's Beltline and its potential contribution to building a new urban culture for this century. Read full book review >
THE RAREST BIRD IN THE WORLD by Vernon R.L. Head
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 15, 2016

"Die-hard bird-watchers may forgive Head's indulgences, but others may wish for a crisper telling."
A dedicated bird-watcher's narrative of a quest for the Nechisar Nightjar, a bird never seen live, known only to scientists by a single wing found in 1990. Read full book review >
RIGHTFUL HERITAGE by Douglas Brinkley
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 15, 2016

"Overlong, as are so many of Brinkley's books, but a brightly written, highly useful argument, especially in a time when the public domain is under siege."
Brinkley (History/Rice Univ.; Cronkite, 2012, etc.) returns with the provocative argument that Theodore Roosevelt was not the only environmentalist in the Roosevelt clan—far from it.Read full book review >
British Columbia by Frank Townsley
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: March 9, 2016

"A perfect gift for a friend with a mountain cabin and a coffee table."
A naturalist, teacher, and guide shares his appreciation for his home province in this debut collection of gorgeous photographs and watercolors. Read full book review >
MY BRAIN ON FIRE by Leonard Pitt
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 8, 2016

"From start to finish, Pitt's memoir is a lively autodidactic romp through a life well-lived in both mind and body."
A theater actor's memoir of a life and way of thinking permanently altered by the seven years he spent as a young man living in 1960s Paris. Read full book review >
HALF-EARTH by Edward O. Wilson
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: March 7, 2016

"Not so much a potent plan as another informed plea for humanity to act as stewards of the biosphere rather than owners."
The noted naturalist and Pulitzer Prize-winning author again waxes eloquent on behalf of the biosphere. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nancy Isenberg
author of WHITE TRASH
July 19, 2016

Poor Americans have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlement. They were alternately known as “waste people,” “offals,” “rubbish,” “lazy lubbers,” and “crackers.” By the 1850s, the downtrodden included so-called “clay eaters” and “sandhillers,” known for prematurely aged children distinguished by their yellowish skin, ragged clothing, and listless minds. Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over 400 years, in White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America, Nancy Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society––where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. “A riveting thesis supported by staggering research,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >