Nature & Travel Book Reviews

SIXTY DEGREES NORTH by Malachy Tallack
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 15, 2016

"An enthralling meditation on place."
A longing for home sends the author around the world. Read full book review >
BITTERROOT by Steven Faulkner
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 7, 2016

"A fine travelogue worthy of shelving next to Jonathan Raban and William Least Heat-Moon."
A well-recounted father-and-son journey in the Missouri River country. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 5, 2016

"Indelible characters, adventurous spirit, and acute psychological insight combine in this multilayered debut."
A memoir of arctic adventure that goes deeper into self-discovery and finding a home. Read full book review >
BEING A BEAST by Charles Foster
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 21, 2016

"A splendid, vivid contribution to the literature of nature."
In which an English author, tired of the high street, takes to the fens and burrows to learn how animals live. Read full book review >
NO WAY BUT GENTLENESSE by Richard Hines
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 24, 2016

"A delightful story of a boy, his birds, and his pursuit of knowledge in spite of society's dictates."
How catching and training a kestrel changed the life of a young British boy. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 15, 2016

"Great fun for anyone with even a slight knowledge of Roman and English history and geography—or those curious about them."
A delightful trip from Rome to Hadrian's Wall—in C.E. 130. Read full book review >
MEMORIES by Teffi
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 6, 2016

"Fluently translated by several hands and introduced by Teffi's biographer, Edythe Haber, these are priceless anecdotes and beautiful portraits of friends and acquaintances lost forever."
Poignant reflections of a beloved Russian humorist as she fled her homeland on the eve of Bolshevik victory. Read full book review >
WHITE SANDS by Geoff Dyer
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 3, 2016

"A mesmerizing compendium that reflects on time, place, and just what, exactly, we are doing here."
In a slender volume that contains multitudes, the award-winning critic and novelist details his travels in such far-flung places as Tahiti and the Arctic Circle. Read full book review >
ARE WE SMART ENOUGH TO KNOW HOW SMART ANIMALS ARE? by Frans de Waal
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: April 25, 2016

"After this edifying book, a trip to the zoo may never be the same."
Intrigued by the search for intelligent life? No need for space travel—it's happening right here on Earth, and the results are amazing. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 19, 2016

"A well-documented, brave, and useful overview."
A journey through the Middle East in the post-Arab Spring landscape. Read full book review >
FAR AND AWAY by Andrew Solomon
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 19, 2016

"Agile, informative, even revelatory pieces that, together, show us both the great variety of humanity and the interior of a gifted writer's heart."
A veteran journalist and travel writer collects pieces dating back to the late 1980s. Read full book review >
BRILLIANT BEACONS by Eric Jay Dolin
HISTORY
Released: April 18, 2016

"A delightful journey with excellent sketches, renderings, and resources for museums and organizations."
A fine history of lighthouses, "among the most beloved and romanticized structures in the American landscape." Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nancy Isenberg
author of WHITE TRASH
July 19, 2016

Poor Americans have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlement. They were alternately known as “waste people,” “offals,” “rubbish,” “lazy lubbers,” and “crackers.” By the 1850s, the downtrodden included so-called “clay eaters” and “sandhillers,” known for prematurely aged children distinguished by their yellowish skin, ragged clothing, and listless minds. Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over 400 years, in White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America, Nancy Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society––where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. “A riveting thesis supported by staggering research,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >