Nature & Travel Book Reviews

OF ORCAS AND MEN by David Neiwert
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: June 16, 2015

"A wide-ranging, interesting book that should be required reading for school-aged environmentalists."
A champion for orcas convincingly spells out the threats to their survival, their misery in captivity, and what scientists can learn by studying them. Read full book review >
FASTEST THINGS ON WINGS by Terry Masear
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 16, 2015

"Not just for birders, this captivating book brims with warmth, humor, and drama that will have wide appeal."
The frantic, rewarding life of a hummingbird-rescue hotline worker. Read full book review >

SKYFARING by Mark Vanhoenacker
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 3, 2015

"The anatomy of an airliner and peripatetic aerial travel, as well as a sophisticated worldview, combine for first-class reading—sure to enhance your next flight."
Vanhoenacker's workplace is the cockpit of a 747. Leaving a contrail of information with lapidary prose, he shows why he loves his job. Read full book review >
GEORGE THE DOG, JOHN THE ARTIST by John Dolan
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 2, 2015

"A disarmingly modest yet profound tale of redemption."
The story of a desperately poor Londoner and a twice-abandoned Staffordshire bull terrier named George poses the question, "Who rescued whom?" Read full book review >
TEACHING PLATO IN PALESTINE by Carlos Fraenkel
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 1, 2015

"Fresh, iconoclastic, stimulating debates."
A valiant attempt to provoke philosophical questions about identity and purpose in unlikely hotspots. Read full book review >

THE WORLD ON A PLATE by Mina Holland
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 26, 2015

"A culinary adventure that delights on many levels and leaves readers hungering for more."
In her first book, Guardian Cook editor Holland salutes classic dishes from a few dozen different countries. Read full book review >
DOMESTICATED by Richard C. Francis
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: May 25, 2015

"A highly illuminating look at the cross-species biological basis for human culture and sociability."
"The human population explosion has been bad for most other living things, but not so for those lucky enough to warrant domestication," writes science journalist Francis (Epigenetics: The Ultimate Mystery of Inheritance, 2011, etc.) in this provocative account of the latest developments in the field of evolutionary biology.Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 12, 2015

"A colorfully descriptive memoir of life as a writer working the Paris fashion beat."
One woman's passionate pursuit of fashion in the City of Light. Read full book review >
CITY BY CITY by Keith Gessen
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: May 12, 2015

"From Whittier, Alaska, to Williston, North Dakota, to Palm Coast, Florida, these varied essays offer compelling snapshots of how Americans live, move, and work."
In these 37 singular essays, some reading like research papers, others as personal as memoirs, n+1 editor Gessen (All the Sad Young Literary Men, 2008, etc.) and Harvard graduate student Squibb find in certain American cities the crucible of enormous change since the financial meltdown of 2008.Read full book review >
LESSER BEASTS by Mark Essig
FOOD & COOKING
Released: May 5, 2015

"A lively, informative farm-to-table feast."
An enlightening culinary history of an "uncanny beast." Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 5, 2015

"Weintraub's research on the prisoners' experiences in the camps is remarkable as he narrates Judy and Frank's heroic tale."
An unusual and moving story of a singular hero among fellow POWs of the Japanese during World War II: a loyal British pointer named Judy. Read full book review >
DAUGHTERS OF THE SAMURAI by Janice P. Nimura
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 4, 2015

"An extraordinary, elegantly told story of the beginning of Japan's education and emancipation of its women."
Through her fascinating tapestry of history and biography, New York scholar Nimura weaves the strange, vibrant tale of an insular nation coming to terms with currents of modernism it could no longer keep out. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Beatriz Williams
June 23, 2015

In Beatriz Williams’ latest novel Tiny Little Thing, it’s the summer of 1966 and Christina Hardcastle—“Tiny” to her illustrious family—stands on the brink of a breathtaking future. Of the three Schuyler sisters, she’s the one raised to marry a man destined for leadership, and with her elegance and impeccable style, she presents a perfect camera-ready image in the dawning age of television politics. Together she and her husband, Frank, make the ultimate power couple: intelligent, rich, and impossibly attractive. It seems nothing can stop Frank from rising to national office, and he’s got his sights set on a senate seat in November. But as the season gets underway at the family estate on Cape Cod, three unwelcome visitors appear in Tiny’s perfect life. “A fascinating look at wealth, love, ambition, secrets, and what family members will and won’t do to protect each other,” our reviewer writes. View video >