Nature & Travel Book Reviews

NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"An entertaining, informative guidebook to some cool places populated by people to whom attention should be paid."
A tour of the territories of the United States, "those scattered shards of earth and populace that make up our outposts far from the North American continent." Read full book review >
CANNIBALISM by Bill Schutt
HISTORY
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"One takeaway: humans don't taste like chicken. A learned, accessible, and engaging approach to a meaty—beg pardon—and always-controversial subject."
Zoologist Schutt (Biology/LIU Post; Dark Banquet: Blood and the Curious Lives of Blood-Feeding Creatures, 2008) gets to the heart of the matter of a topic that makes people shudder. Read full book review >

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Feb. 14, 2017

"A quick and instructive read for readers with a casual interest in this quickly changing company as well as those fascinated by the fates of startups."
A fast-moving, well-researched account of the founding and surprising growth of home-sharing company Airbnb. Read full book review >
THE NATURE FIX by Florence Williams
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"A thoughtful, refreshing book with a simple but powerful message: 'Go outside, often, sometimes in wild places. Bring friends or not. Breathe.'"
A journalist explores the relationship between nature and human well-being. Read full book review >
NO BARRIERS by Erik Weihenmayer
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"A wonderful tribute to the greatness of the human spirit."
The first blind man to climb Mount Everest narrates his kayaking descent of 300 miles of the Colorado River through the Grand Canyon. Read full book review >

NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"A plausible and provocative hypothesis on how methods of memorization may have laid the groundwork for many mysterious extant monuments."
A thought-provoking theory on "memory palaces" and their significance to ancient ancestral civilizations. Read full book review >
THE BOOK THAT CHANGED AMERICA by Randall Fuller
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 24, 2017

"A fresh, invigorating history of philosophical and political struggles."
A vibrant history of the reception of Charles Darwin's ideas by American minds and spirits. Read full book review >
THE UNSETTLERS by Mark Sundeen
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 10, 2017

"Provocative reading for anyone who has ever yearned for a life of radical simplicity."
Bright update on the perennial back-to-the-land movement. Read full book review >
THE LOST CITY OF THE MONKEY GOD by Douglas Preston
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Jan. 3, 2017

"A story that moves from thrilling to sobering, fascinating to downright scary—trademark Preston, in other words, and another winner."
"Once again I had the strong feeling, when flying into the valley, that I was leaving the twenty-first century entirely": another perilous Preston (The Kraken Project, 2014, etc.) prestidigitation. Read full book review >
THE FLOOD YEAR 1927 by Susan Scott Parrish
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 1, 2017

"As a cubist might, Parrish paints a multifaceted portrait of catastrophe: sometimes puzzling, often surprising, and wholly original."
A scholar's cross-disciplinary look back at the little-remembered greatest natural disaster in American history. Read full book review >
THE WOOD FOR THE TREES by Richard Fortey
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 7, 2016

"An eloquent, eccentric, and precise nature memoir."
A distinguished British paleontologist offers a meticulously compiled "biography" of four acres of woodland in Oxfordshire, England. Read full book review >
THE MARCHES by Rory Stewart
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 22, 2016

"Another winner from a consistently engaging author."
The author's journey along Hadrian's Wall, which allowed him "to explore and answer questions about Scottish nationalism, Rome, Frontiers, and Empires." Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kathleen Kent
author of THE DIME
February 20, 2017

Dallas, Texas is not for the faint of heart. Good thing for Betty Rhyzyk she's from a family of take-no-prisoners Brooklyn police detectives. But in Kathleen Kent’s new novel The Dime, her Big Apple wisdom will only get her so far when she relocates to The Big D, where Mexican drug cartels and cult leaders, deadbeat skells and society wives all battle for sunbaked turf. Betty is as tough as the best of them, but she's deeply shaken when her first investigation goes sideways. Battling a group of unruly subordinates, a persistent stalker, a formidable criminal organization, and an unsupportive girlfriend, the unbreakable Detective Betty Rhyzyk may be reaching her limit. “Violent, sexy, and completely absorbing,” our critic writes in a starred review. “Kent's detective is Sam Spade reincarnated—as a brilliant, modern woman.” View video >