Nature & Travel Book Reviews

IF VENICE DIES by Salvatore Settis
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"An impassioned plea that every lover of Venice, urban planner, architect, and cultural historian should read."
Archaeologist and art historian Settis (The Future of the Classical, 2006, etc.) explores how troubled Venice is capable of being the true vision of a city. Read full book review >
RANCHER, FARMER, FISHERMAN by Miriam Horn
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 6, 2016

"An optimistic journal of promise for the future and a supremely motivational text for readers interested in Earth's compromised biodiversity."
Journalistic portraits of pioneering farmers, harvesters, and conservationists unafraid to fight for the protection of the American landscapes they cultivate. Read full book review >

FAMILY OF EARTH by Wilma Dykeman
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 6, 2016

"A captivating, poetic, difficult-to-categorize book that abundantly showcases the author's talent for making words dance. Anyone who has lived in the countryside, or wished they had, will enjoy Dykeman's celebration of nature."
The first publication of a long-lost work by revered Appalachian writer Dykeman (1920-2006). Read full book review >
THE CURE FOR CATASTROPHE by Robert Muir-Wood
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 6, 2016

"Readers will find it hard to stop reading this excellent book and will share the author's perhaps futile yearning that elected officials have the courage to pass inconvenient laws and spend the electorate's money to prevent disasters."
A fascinating examination of the "forensics of disasters." Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Aug. 23, 2016

"A sprawling, vibrant book about soccer in Argentina, a country where the sport is every bit as important and reflective of the society as it is anywhere in the world."
The history of soccer and its singular place in Argentine society. Read full book review >

RIVERINE by Angela Palm
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 16, 2016

"An intelligent, evocative, and richly textured memoir."
The haunting account of how the author tried to escape her rural Indiana past. Read full book review >
TASTES LIKE CHICKEN by Emelyn Rude
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Aug. 15, 2016

"All this from an author who admits, 'I am a chicken historian who does not actually like eating chicken,' but who finds the bird as fascinating as she makes it for readers."
In her first book, a food historian with a feature writer's flair illuminates the culinary history of the now-ubiquitous chicken. Read full book review >
LANDMARKS by Robert Macfarlane
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 2, 2016

"Lucent, lyrical prose evokes Macfarlane's aesthetic, ethical, and powerfully tactile response to nature's enchantments."
A prizewinning naturalist explores the connection between what we say and how we see. Read full book review >
AND SOON I HEARD A ROARING WIND by Bill Streever
HISTORY
Released: July 26, 2016

"Streever has a knack for blending his research and personal experience into an easy-to-read account that is hard to put down. Recommended for general readers curious about the natural world as well as budding scientists."
Science, history, and personal adventure come together in a wild and witty exploration of wind. Read full book review >
SIXTY DEGREES NORTH by Malachy Tallack
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 15, 2016

"An enthralling meditation on place."
A longing for home sends the author around the world. Read full book review >
BITTERROOT by Steven Faulkner
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 7, 2016

"A fine travelogue worthy of shelving next to Jonathan Raban and William Least Heat-Moon."
A well-recounted father-and-son journey in the Missouri River country. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 5, 2016

"Indelible characters, adventurous spirit, and acute psychological insight combine in this multilayered debut."
A memoir of arctic adventure that goes deeper into self-discovery and finding a home. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jeff Chang
September 20, 2016

In the provocative essays in journalist Jeff Chang’s new book We Gon’ Be Alright, Chang takes an incisive and wide-ranging look at the recent tragedies and widespread protests that have shaken the country. Through deep reporting with key activists and thinkers, personal writing, and cultural criticism, We Gon’ Be Alright links #BlackLivesMatter to #OscarsSoWhite, Ferguson to Washington D.C., the Great Migration to resurgent nativism. Chang explores the rise and fall of the idea of “diversity,” the roots of student protest, changing ideas about Asian Americanness, and the impact of a century of racial separation in housing. “He implores readers to listen, act, and become involved with today’s activists, who offer ‘new ways to see our past and our present,’ ” our reviewer writes in a starred review. “A compelling and intellectually thought-provoking exploration of the quagmire of race relations.” View video >