Nature & Travel Book Reviews

THE NATURE FIX by Florence Williams
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"A thoughtful, refreshing book with a simple but powerful message: 'Go outside, often, sometimes in wild places. Bring friends or not. Breathe.'"
A journalist explores the relationship between nature and human well-being. Read full book review >
NO BARRIERS by Erik Weihenmayer
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"A wonderful tribute to the greatness of the human spirit."
The first blind man to climb Mount Everest narrates his kayaking descent of 300 miles of the Colorado River through the Grand Canyon. Read full book review >

THE BOOK THAT CHANGED AMERICA by Randall Fuller
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 24, 2017

"A fresh, invigorating history of philosophical and political struggles."
A vibrant history of the reception of Charles Darwin's ideas by American minds and spirits. Read full book review >
THE LOST CITY OF THE MONKEY GOD by Douglas Preston
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Jan. 3, 2017

"A story that moves from thrilling to sobering, fascinating to downright scary—trademark Preston, in other words, and another winner."
"Once again I had the strong feeling, when flying into the valley, that I was leaving the twenty-first century entirely": another perilous Preston (The Kraken Project, 2014, etc.) prestidigitation. Read full book review >
THE MARCHES by Rory Stewart
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 22, 2016

"Another winner from a consistently engaging author."
The author's journey along Hadrian's Wall, which allowed him "to explore and answer questions about Scottish nationalism, Rome, Frontiers, and Empires." Read full book review >

THE UNNATURAL WORLD by David Biello
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Nov. 15, 2016

"In this well-written, significant book, Biello insists that humans, the world's most successful invasive species, have the ability to engage in planetary protection and human survival, but it will require wisdom, innovation, and restraint."
In his first book, Scientific American editor Biello argues that it is not a lack of money or technology that prevents our addressing environmental and societal ills but rather a lack of motivation. Read full book review >
SAINT-GERMAIN-DES-PRÉS by John Baxter
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Nov. 8, 2016

"Whether you're planning your first trip to Paris or absolutely have to stop in Paris on your way anywhere, this book, in addition to the author's previous guides, is essential."
Baxter (Hemingway's Paris: A User's Guide, 2016, etc.) provides another delightful salute to Paris. Read full book review >
COAST RANGE by Nick Neely
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 8, 2016

"Neely capably explores the complexity of his subjects with polish and finesse, looking carefully and thinking deeply."
A collection of essays that focuses on the interaction between humans and the natural world in and around the Rogue River in Oregon, where the author spent six months doing a writing residency. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Nov. 1, 2016

"Long, leisurely, and vastly entertaining."
The story of a 1913 Arctic expedition to investigate what the New York Tribune called "the last considerable mass of unknown land on our planet." Read full book review >
BLACK SQUARE by Sophie Pinkham
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 2016

"First-rate reporting, research, and writing in a debut that will make readers care as much as the author does."
A journalist's first book, a graceful mix of personal memoir and political research, illuminates the complexities of Ukraine culture. Read full book review >
IF VENICE DIES by Salvatore Settis
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"An impassioned plea that every lover of Venice, urban planner, architect, and cultural historian should read."
Archaeologist and art historian Settis (The Future of the Classical, 2006, etc.) explores how troubled Venice is capable of being the true vision of a city. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 6, 2016

"An optimistic journal of promise for the future and a supremely motivational text for readers interested in Earth's compromised biodiversity."
Journalistic portraits of pioneering farmers, harvesters, and conservationists unafraid to fight for the protection of the American landscapes they cultivate. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Yoojin Grace Wuertz
February 27, 2017

In Yoojin Grace Wuertz’s debut novel Everything Belongs to Us, the setting is Seoul in 1978. At South Korea’s top university, the nation’s best and brightest compete to join the professional elite of an authoritarian regime. Success could lead to a life of rarefied privilege and wealth; failure means being left irrevocably behind. For childhood friends Jisun and Namin, the stakes couldn’t be more different. Jisun, the daughter of a powerful business mogul, grew up on a mountainside estate with lush gardens and a dedicated chauffeur. Namin’s parents run a tented food cart from dawn to curfew; her sister works in a shoe factory. Now Jisun wants as little to do with her father’s world as possible, abandoning her schoolwork in favor of the underground activist movement, while Namin studies tirelessly in the service of one goal: to launch herself and her family out of poverty. But everything changes when Jisun and Namin meet an ambitious, charming student named Sunam, whose need to please his family has led him to a prestigious club: the Circle. Under the influence of his mentor, Juno, a manipulative social climber, Sunam becomes entangled with both women, as they all make choices that will change their lives forever. “Engrossing,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. “Wuertz is an important new voice in American fiction.” View video >