Nature & Travel Book Reviews

FASTEST THINGS ON WINGS by Terry Masear
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 16, 2015

"Not just for birders, this captivating book brims with warmth, humor, and drama that will have wide appeal."
The frantic, rewarding life of a hummingbird-rescue hotline worker. Read full book review >
GEORGE THE DOG, JOHN THE ARTIST by John Dolan
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 2, 2015

"A disarmingly modest yet profound tale of redemption."
The story of a desperately poor Londoner and a twice-abandoned Staffordshire bull terrier named George poses the question, "Who rescued whom?" Read full book review >

OF ORCAS AND MEN by David Neiwert
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: June 16, 2015

"A wide-ranging, interesting book that should be required reading for school-aged environmentalists."
A champion for orcas convincingly spells out the threats to their survival, their misery in captivity, and what scientists can learn by studying them. Read full book review >
THE WORLD ON A PLATE by Mina Holland
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 26, 2015

"A culinary adventure that delights on many levels and leaves readers hungering for more."
In her first book, Guardian Cook editor Holland salutes classic dishes from a few dozen different countries. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 5, 2015

"Weintraub's research on the prisoners' experiences in the camps is remarkable as he narrates Judy and Frank's heroic tale."
An unusual and moving story of a singular hero among fellow POWs of the Japanese during World War II: a loyal British pointer named Judy. Read full book review >

DOMESTICATED by Richard C. Francis
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: May 25, 2015

"A highly illuminating look at the cross-species biological basis for human culture and sociability."
"The human population explosion has been bad for most other living things, but not so for those lucky enough to warrant domestication," writes science journalist Francis (Epigenetics: The Ultimate Mystery of Inheritance, 2011, etc.) in this provocative account of the latest developments in the field of evolutionary biology.Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 12, 2015

"A colorfully descriptive memoir of life as a writer working the Paris fashion beat."
One woman's passionate pursuit of fashion in the City of Light. Read full book review >
CITY BY CITY by Keith Gessen
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: May 12, 2015

"From Whittier, Alaska, to Williston, North Dakota, to Palm Coast, Florida, these varied essays offer compelling snapshots of how Americans live, move, and work."
In these 37 singular essays, some reading like research papers, others as personal as memoirs, n+1 editor Gessen (All the Sad Young Literary Men, 2008, etc.) and Harvard graduate student Squibb find in certain American cities the crucible of enormous change since the financial meltdown of 2008.Read full book review >
TEACHING PLATO IN PALESTINE by Carlos Fraenkel
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 1, 2015

"Fresh, iconoclastic, stimulating debates."
A valiant attempt to provoke philosophical questions about identity and purpose in unlikely hotspots. Read full book review >
LESSER BEASTS by Mark Essig
FOOD & COOKING
Released: May 5, 2015

"A lively, informative farm-to-table feast."
An enlightening culinary history of an "uncanny beast." Read full book review >
COAL WARS by Richard Martin
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 14, 2015

"Martin is unequivocal and persuasive: The best use of coal is in holiday stockings."
Coal will never stop blighting our planet, writes energy analyst Martin (SuperFuel: Thorium, the Green Energy Source for the Future, 2012), and its good riddance can't come too soon.Read full book review >
A PASSION FOR PARIS by David Downie
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 28, 2015

"Anyone who loves Paris will adore this joyful book. Readers visiting the city are advised to take it with them to discover countless new experiences."
Join Downie (Paris to the Pyrenees: A Skeptic Pilgrim Walks the Way of St. James, 2013, etc.) for a top-notch walking tour of Paris.Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frank Bruni
March 31, 2015

Over the last few decades, Americans have turned college admissions into a terrifying and occasionally devastating process, preceded by test prep, tutors, all sorts of stratagems, all kinds of rankings, and a conviction among too many young people that their futures will be determined and their worth established by which schools say yes and which say no. In Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be, New York Times columnist Frank Bruni explains why, giving students and their parents a new perspective on this brutal, deeply flawed competition and a path out of the anxiety that it provokes. “Written in a lively style but carrying a wallop, this is a book that family and educators cannot afford to overlook as they try to navigate the treacherous waters of college admissions,” our reviewer writes. View video >