Nature & Travel Book Reviews

Released: Dec. 15, 2015

"First-rate reporting and erudition underlie this successful effort to re-establish the reputation of an indispensable scientist."
A United States Geological Survey scientist returns with a rich account of one of his predecessors: Thomas Jaggar (1871-1953), a somewhat forgotten pioneer in volcanology. Read full book review >
Released: Jan. 11, 2016

"An unusual and vastly entertaining journey into the world of mysterious plant life as experienced by a gifted nature writer."
A prolific and talented British nature writer explores 40 plant species and how they have influenced the human imagination over the centuries. Read full book review >

Dear Mom and Dad by Georgia Lee McGowen
Released: July 6, 2012

"A compassionate portrait of self-acceptance and gender identity."
McGowen's debut memoir traces the dual-genderedwriter's gradual realization that two singular souls, George and Georgia, "just happen to coexist" in the same body. Read full book review >
London: A Visitor's Guide by Craig Cross
Released: April 21, 2014

"A work in progress that's already bearing serious fruit."
Another guide book to London, this one proving its worth. Read full book review >
TRACE by Lauret Savoy
Released: Nov. 10, 2015

"Springing from the literal Earth to metaphor, Savoy demonstrates the power of narrative to erase as easily as it reveals, yielding a provocative, eclectic exposé of the palimpsest historically defining the U.S. as much as any natural or man-made boundary."
An earth scientist explores the broad historical branches extending from her own roots. Read full book review >

THE PLANET REMADE by Oliver Morton
Released: Nov. 3, 2015

"An important account of cutting-edge research that will fascinate serious readers and demand the attention of policymakers."
Economist briefings editor Morton (Eating the Sun: How Plants Power the Planet, 2008, etc.) offers a calm, rational discussion of deliberate technological interventions to cool the planet's climate system.Read full book review >
Released: Nov. 10, 2015

"As satisfying as any trip by Paul Theroux but with a much less prickly and much more forgiving narrator."
Journalist/translator and intrepid traveler Porter (Zen Baggage: A Pilgrimage to China, 2008, etc.) takes readers on another virtual journey into the China few Westerners know.Read full book review >
THE ROAD TAKEN by Henry Petroski
Released: Feb. 16, 2016

"Anyone with an interest in the way things work will want this book—and will doubtless emerge as a fan of the ever curious author."
Noted engineer and writer Petroski (Civil Engineering/Duke Univ.; To Forgive Design: Understanding Failure, 2012, etc.) gives readers a characteristically eye-opening look at America's infrastructure.Read full book review >
Released: Dec. 1, 2015

"A thoughtfully observed travel memoir and history."
A filmmaker and writer tells the story of the historical figures and ordinary people who have attempted to "control, adapt to, or explore" the largely wild and untamed Andes cordillera. Read full book review >
THE HIDDEN HALF OF NATURE by David R. Montgomery
Released: Nov. 16, 2015

"A must-read for avid gardeners, those interested in bolstering our precarious food supply, or anyone remotely concerned about their health and the soil under their feet."
A geologist and a biologist and environmental planner chronicle the transformation of their desolate Seattle backyard into a fertile garden and how they learned about the importance of beneficial microbes in their newly revived soil. Read full book review >
THE ART OF GRACE by Sarah L. Kaufman
Released: Nov. 16, 2015

"An insightful, intelligent examination of grace, which often 'seems to elude fixed meaning.'"
Pulitzer Prize-winning Washington Post dance critic Kaufman reflects on the meaning of grace in modern society.Read full book review >
BOUNDLESS by Kathleen Winter
Released: Oct. 13, 2015

"With the eye of a poet and the stamina of an Amundsen, Winter proves a delightful guide into unexplored realms. Worthy of shelving alongside Barry Lopez's Arctic Dreams (1986)."
Literate, luminous travels in the far north. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Marie Lu
September 29, 2015

In the second installment of Marie Lu’s Young Elites series, The Rose Society, Adelina Amouteru’s heart has suffered at the hands of both family and friends, turning her down the bitter path of revenge. Now known and feared as the White Wolf, she and her sister flee Kenettra to find other Young Elites in the hopes of building her own army of allies. Her goal: to strike down the Inquisition Axis, the white-cloaked soldiers who nearly killed her. But Adelina is no heroine. Her powers, fed only by fear and hate, have started to grow beyond her control. She does not trust her newfound Elite friends. Teren Santoro, leader of the Inquisition, wants her dead. And her former friends, Raffaele and the Dagger Society, want to stop her thirst for vengeance. Adelina struggles to cling to the good within her. But how can someone be good, when her very existence depends on darkness? “The direction of this trilogy's conclusion is left refreshingly difficult to predict,” our reviewer writes. View video >