Nature & Travel Book Reviews

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 25, 2016

"An insightful book that should be of interest to anyone who eats food, animal or not."
Unsentimental study of the dangers in how meat is produced and distributed around the world, particularly in the United States. Read full book review >
BEING A DOG by Alexandra Horowitz
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Oct. 4, 2016

"Dog owners curious about the lives of their pets will savor this book, but it deserves a wider audience than just animal lovers."
If the olfactory ability of dogs seems like a dull topic, be prepared for a surprise. This engrossing book takes on not just canine noses, but what we can do with our own—with a little experience and a good guide. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: Sept. 27, 2016

"A lovingly written book that should appeal to most city dwellers and all tree lovers."
A comprehensive look at the trees of American cities. Read full book review >
TREEHAB by Bob Smith
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 27, 2016

"A truth-telling tour conducted by an agile guide."
The first openly gay comedian to perform on the Tonight Show delivers a collection of witty essays exploring his remarkable career and life. Read full book review >
VIETNAM by Christopher Goscha
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"A vigorous, eye-opening account of a country of great importance to the world, past and future."
America was not the first world power to meet defeat in far-distant Vietnam. The reasons for that loss emerge from this welcome overview of that nation's history. Read full book review >

FAMILY OF EARTH by Wilma Dykeman
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 6, 2016

"A captivating, poetic, difficult-to-categorize book that abundantly showcases the author's talent for making words dance. Anyone who has lived in the countryside, or wished they had, will enjoy Dykeman's celebration of nature."
The first publication of a long-lost work by revered Appalachian writer Dykeman (1920-2006). Read full book review >
THE CURE FOR CATASTROPHE by Robert Muir-Wood
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 6, 2016

"Readers will find it hard to stop reading this excellent book and will share the author's perhaps futile yearning that elected officials have the courage to pass inconvenient laws and spend the electorate's money to prevent disasters."
A fascinating examination of the "forensics of disasters." Read full book review >
THE NAMES OF THE STARS by Pete Fromm
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 27, 2016

"Fromm's finely tuned reflections on this small but fully inhabited piece of the backwoods make this an adventure worth savoring."
A middle-aged novelist and creative-writing teacher spends a month in the wilderness keeping an eye on baby fish for the National Forest Service and reliving his earlier experiences in the wild. Read full book review >
TASTES LIKE CHICKEN by Emelyn Rude
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Aug. 15, 2016

"All this from an author who admits, 'I am a chicken historian who does not actually like eating chicken,' but who finds the bird as fascinating as she makes it for readers."
In her first book, a food historian with a feature writer's flair illuminates the culinary history of the now-ubiquitous chicken. Read full book review >
IF VENICE DIES by Salvatore Settis
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"An impassioned plea that every lover of Venice, urban planner, architect, and cultural historian should read."
Archaeologist and art historian Settis (The Future of the Classical, 2006, etc.) explores how troubled Venice is capable of being the true vision of a city. Read full book review >
RANCHER, FARMER, FISHERMAN by Miriam Horn
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 6, 2016

"An optimistic journal of promise for the future and a supremely motivational text for readers interested in Earth's compromised biodiversity."
Journalistic portraits of pioneering farmers, harvesters, and conservationists unafraid to fight for the protection of the American landscapes they cultivate. Read full book review >
Why Can't Somebody Just Die Around Here? by Gerhard Maroscher
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR

"A memoir that offers a rare, underrepresented perspective on World War II."
Maroscher (Short Stories: German 1.1 Reader, 2011, etc.) recounts the challenges of being a young boy in Europe during World War II and growing up in America in its aftermath. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nancy Isenberg
author of WHITE TRASH
July 19, 2016

Poor Americans have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlement. They were alternately known as “waste people,” “offals,” “rubbish,” “lazy lubbers,” and “crackers.” By the 1850s, the downtrodden included so-called “clay eaters” and “sandhillers,” known for prematurely aged children distinguished by their yellowish skin, ragged clothing, and listless minds. Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over 400 years, in White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America, Nancy Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society––where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. “A riveting thesis supported by staggering research,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >