A CHANGE OF GODS by Neal Oxe

A CHANGE OF GODS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The title- presumably- has a dual meaning, but the one that emerges as the book its end, is the solution (if such it can be called) of the internal conflict between Catholicism and Judaism, as Paul Shiel, born a Jew, but with little knowledge of his heritage, finds an escape in Catholicism. A secondary theme lies in his struggle to rationalize family loyalty, particularly in a guilt sense towards his father, with his high goals and faith in his chosen profession, the law. That he brings these two conflicts into focus with resultant total disaster is never made wholly rational or convincing, and therein lies the weakness of a book that otherwise has distinctive merit as a study of ""mixed"" marriage. The story opens in the south of France, where Paul and Candy meet and fall in love. Candy, a ""lapsed Catholic"", and Paul, an indifferent Jew, think they can work out their passion in an extra-marital relationship -- until Candy becomes pregnant. Their subsequent marriage is fraught with danger- an each mid-western family resists, partially accepts and then the whole issue explodes, just as a federal tax case against Paul's father threatens to bring exposure and disgrace. The quality of the book lies in its parts rather than its whole.

Pub Date: Aug. 22nd, 1962
Publisher: Harcourt, Brace & World