MUSIC FROM INSIDE OUT by Ned Rorem

MUSIC FROM INSIDE OUT

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This book has more to say about Ned Rorem's preoccupations than the subject announced in its title, for music in general is touched only occasionally and even then at a level that is neither introductory (where he might make certain basic distinctions clear.) nor seriously critical, where he might elaborate his rather off-hand remarks. The most substantial section deals with ""Music for the Mouth"" or songs, the genre at which Rorem is particularly known. Otherwise, the book, which consists largely of lectures delivered at Buffalo six years ago, observes various dimensions of current practice. Here, Rorem has the annoying habit of raising hard questions that he barely attempts to answer, as in the chapter entitled ""Is New Music New""; and many remarks on the musical scene are so dated and/or so obvious that they offer little useful perception. Finally, although Rorem admires and perhaps emulates Virgil Thomson, he lacks the latter's real flair for wit and epigram. As a short book, Music from Inside Out is slight in several crucial respects.

Pub Date: March 1st, 1967
Publisher: Braziller