THE SUMMER JERRY NEVER SAW by Neil S.J. Boyton

THE SUMMER JERRY NEVER SAW

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The author has tried to mix too many ingredients into this book to make it successful. The pathos of a boy losing his sight in his early teens, plus an over-emphasis on religion, plus wearisome boy scout antics and conversation combine to make this dull reading. And it nood not have been. Religion can be an adventure; loss of sight -- as proved continually with our blinded veterans in rehabilitation centers today can be compensated for by training and psychological approach. But here it is made into a somewhat moralizing treatise...Jerry, having returned from the hospital following an operation which left him blind, is taken to Camp Manhattan by his follow scouts, and there proves that he can still be a good camper, doing his share, having his quota of fun. The usual swimming races, group contests, long hikes, etc. take place against a background of self-conscious horse-play that is neither convincing nor interesting.

Pub Date: June 1st, 1945
Publisher: Longmans, Green