THE BOOK OF WHERE by Neill Bell

THE BOOK OF WHERE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

In the undemanding, anti-intimidating manner of the series, this Brown Paper School book could provide reluctant students or youngr children with an easy familiarization with maps or a preliminary orientation to the lay of the land and the globe. After a far from rigorous warm-up in the home, Bell moves out to the neighborhood, where kids are asked to map routes and reference points, look for a pattern to their street names, and make a magnetic compass to help them find directions. These exercises are broken up with a mock sleuth story, and the next chapter, on the town, explains maps' legends, indices, and the zero point of street numbers via a conversation between two taxi drivers. At the state level, there are game-type self-quizzes on state names and borders (you use a map to find the answers, which are provided on the same page) and more on maps themselves; then the perspective is broadened to take in the nation's larger rivers and mountain ranges and broad regions, with more map exercises (""If you were a pilot flying by direction, could you find and name these places?"")--until, going global (with an atlas and a grapefruit for aids), we get a humanized introduction to longitude and latitude, a quick skim over the continents and the idea of continental drift, and, finally, the merest toe-dipping acquaintance with the ocean depths. For groups that need to be put at ease with geography, this could do it.

Pub Date: April 1st, 1982
Publisher: Little, Brown