OUR LOONS ARE ALWAYS LAUGHING by Newton F. Tolman

OUR LOONS ARE ALWAYS LAUGHING

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The writing here has just the right weight, like a hand-carved wooden spoon. Never back-country or merely folksy, Mr. Tolman describes his New Hampshire woods and fields, lakes and hills with pleasant shrewdness and an eye for detail. His subjects include bird-watching, laziness, New Hampshire villages, zoning laws, ""characters"", the passing of the hired man, New Hampshire's lone nudist club, bird shoots, old cars, home-steading, walking in the woods, the low standing of flutists in contemporary music, TV, a Chinese pageant, and a trip to Nigeria. In Nigeria he found intermarriage accepted as a matter of course; over-population; good-looking women; and, altogether, quite a lovable place. He knocks Robert Ruark's Africa books (""...Mr. Ruark's books give a less accurate picture of Africa than one would get of present-day America from reading James Fenimore Cooper""). There's not much to say about Mr. Tolman's present effort except that it makes for an hour of casual reading, avoids small-town humor, and is best concerning Nigeria and the Nigerians.

Publisher: Ives Washburn