THE POLICEMAN'S BIBLE, OR THE ART OF TAKING A BRIBE by Nicholas Ross

THE POLICEMAN'S BIBLE, OR THE ART OF TAKING A BRIBE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Tapping his extensive experience as a police officer in Chicago, the pseudonymous Ross has prepared a manual for rookie patrolmen and uncertain civilians who are seeking both a rationale for bribery and guidance in negotiating obstacles that imperil the flow of gratuities. Pete Pendacopolos, a Greek immigrant who promotes gambling in the backroom of his coffeehouse, confides that bribery allows his patrons and him to pursue their happiness in a manner that would never have been tolerated under the military junta in Athens. Doubtful of the services that penalty-money provides, Ross commends the traffic violator who will pay off a cop at the scene of an infraction rather than waste a business day in court and end up losing the heavier sum of a fine. Furthermore, it hardly matters if a cop is bought by an apprehended felon because even good cases are dismissed from crowded courts. For those who are not bullish on municipal, judicial, or character reform, Ross' book may prove a good investment primer. He's not putting you on.

Pub Date: May 1st, 1976
Publisher: Regnery