THE UNMAKING OF A RUSSIAN by Nicholas Wreden

THE UNMAKING OF A RUSSIAN

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KIRKUS REVIEW

There have been many books about the Russian Revolution, and seldom do they make clear -- or even dramatic -- the confused days of the Russian Civil War, the struggle on four fronts between the White Russians and the Reds, with inadequate equipment, ragged clothes, insufficient food and a vast uncertainty as to what it was all about or where it was leading. This is that story, humanized by its being also the personal experience of a young Russian, a school boy when the war started, later a cadet in the Imperial Naval College. Hairbreadth escapes, experiences both tragic and amusing, and a vivid picture of the confusion and high handedness and cruelty of the strife make this good reading. There is no pretence to be anything other than straight personal narrative. Much of it is a many times told tale. But some of it is new and it is all easy reading. Men will like it for the war strategy and actual fighting, more than women, perhaps. Good chance to link it with the novel on Longmans' list, Romanoff, by Soboleff (see page 228).

Publisher: Norton