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HATCHING TWITTER by Nick Bilton

HATCHING TWITTER

A True Story of Money, Power, Friendship, and Betrayal

By Nick Bilton

Pub Date: Nov. 5th, 2013
ISBN: 978-1-59184-601-7
Publisher: Portfolio

Novelistic rendition of Twitter’s contentious origins in the techie subculture of San Francisco.

New York Times Bits Blog columnist Bilton (I Live in the Future & Here’s How It WorksWhy Your World, Work, and Brain Are Being Creatively Disrupted, 2010) reconstructed this history from interviews and the digital trails (i.e., emails and Twitter timelines) of his four principals: blogger, founder and chief investor Evan “Ev” Williams and his friends and employees Noah Glass, Christopher “Biz” Stone and Jack Dorsey. Each contributed an important share in the invention of the platform that, unbeknown to them at the time, would revolutionize the way the world communicates and interrelates. Williams provided the funds and the space for his colleagues to brainstorm startup and application ideas. Dorsey came up with the idea for a simple “status updater.” Glass pulled the company name, which suggests the vibrating sound a phone might make when it receives an update, from the dictionary. Stone pushed for the company’s light-touch, user-centric ethical and moral dimensions. Almost immediately, Bilton reports, there was tension among the co-founders. Within months, Glass would be pushed out of the circle, denied any glory or much fortune from the company’s future success, and Dorsey, the company’s tentative and inexperienced first CEO, was ousted in a coup just as Twitter was becoming a phenomenon following successful exposure at the 2007 South by Southwest festival. Neither man took these turns well, but whereas Glass eventually made peace with his fate, according to Bilton, Dorsey plotted revenge. The narrative sometimes gets so inside the heads of its subjects, it can seem to blur the line between reporting and fiction, but Bilton insists every thought in the book is based on interviews and “not assumed.”

A captivating study of male camaraderie and competition, more like the story of an indie rock band than one of the world’s most ubiquitous corporations.