THE DOCTORS' GUIDE TO MEDICATION DURING PREGNANCY AND LACTATION by

THE DOCTORS' GUIDE TO MEDICATION DURING PREGNANCY AND LACTATION

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Those familiar warnings, one more time: if possible, don't take any medication during pregnancy--and check with a physician before taking even aspirin. Like their predecessors, Goldberg and Leahy explain that just about every drug taken by a mother will have some effect on the baby. Then, category by category, they cover the particulars on 200 preparations--from alcohol to anti-gout agents to vitamins. And, in view of ""mounting evidence. . . that exposure to certain drugs may significantly affect male reproductive capabilities,"" they include a section on drug ingestion by fathers--covering the same categories in less detail (because less is known). The messages may indeed bear repeating: the average pregnant woman, we know, takes from 4 to 10 drugs during her pregnancy. (Only the elderly use more medications.) But except for readers with a consuming interest in the drug aspect of pregnancy (who will find this clearer and simpler than Peter Fried's 1983 Pregnancy and Life-style Habits), a general guide will suffice.

Pub Date: March 15th, 1984
Publisher: Morrow