TOMATO CAIN by Nigel Kneale

TOMATO CAIN

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A collection of monologues in the form of short stories, reminiscent at times of Poe -- and launched with an introduction by Elizabeth Bowen. In space, they shift from the Isle of Man through ""liberated"" Italy to the sandy fringe of the Battle of El Alamein; in time from the mid-18th century to the present; in content from evil's present to justice's retribution. The title story is a delightful regional piece in which old Eli the Manxman futilely fights the invasion of the ""love apples"" in agriculture; in Enderby and the Sleeping a British soldier comes upon a mysterious tomb in the Sahara and awakens a ""stone"" maidan; Mirror Mirrr is a rapier thrust at the outcome of race prejudice. A number of the stories deal with the furred and feathered but in the main these are delicately etched sketches of the tangled by-paths of human conduct, deceptively transparent, and emerging-as a whole-well above the general level of today's writing.

Pub Date: Nov. 7th, 1950
Publisher: Knopf