CHRISTIAN AND MUSLIM IN AFRICA by Noel Q. King

CHRISTIAN AND MUSLIM IN AFRICA

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Mr. King's work is a narrative history of religion in Africa, from the first inroads of Christianity and Islam to the assumption, by modern presidents, of some of the prerogatives of the old priest-kings of black Africa. For the book, despite its title, is actually the history of four religions: Christianity, Islam, Atiar (the traditional religion), and the amalgam that has resulted from the interworkings of the first three. The author sets out this game of theological musical chairs with much style, perception, and some humor. He is at his best in describing the Muslim theocrats and ""holy warriors"" of the late 18th and early 19th centuries, when Africa was still the ""dark continent"" to geographers and still a closed book to historians. It is to his credit also that he has resisted the temptation to make dangerous comparisons; to say that Christians were better or worse, or more or less savage, than Muslims. A vastly entertaining and informative work of popularization, in the best sense of that term, on a little discussed and hitherto nebulous subject. The book may be read either independently or in conjunction with the author's earlier Religions of Africa.

Pub Date: June 23rd, 1971
Publisher: Harper & Row