THE HOUSE AT SUNSET by Norah Lofts

THE HOUSE AT SUNSET

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Last of the trilogy begun auspiciously in 1959 with the memorable The Town House, which took the readers back to feudal England. It was continued in 1960 with House at Old Vine, which saw a prosperous manor house in the days of Cromwell, on the downward path and ends with its role as a seedy rundown school. Now- in The House at Sunset -Old Vine is a rural tenement, its once handsome facade conceals incredible filth, depravity and occasionally an element of decency. Norah Lofts has handled this final phase of her story through a series of portraits of people who have owned and loved Old Vine during its gradual descent --and of the people who clung to the myth of its former grandeur -- and finally of the uncovering of its decay -- its belated rescue as a ""monument"" and the possibility of some measure of rebirth in its sunset years. One might almost view this as a segment of England's social history, with this latest volume an inside picture of the post-war confusion of issues. While one never feels that the story takes on the unity of a novel -- as in The Town House -- the long range view with the house itself as catalyst -- has much to recommend it.

Pub Date: Oct. 26th, 1962
Publisher: Doubleday